Found 461 Documents across 47 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Cross-cultural correlates of the consonant-vowel (cv) syllableMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1996 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines whether language construction, specifically the number of consonant-vowel syllables, will be related to the environment and literacy of a society. Empirical analysis suggests that consonant-vowel syllables are more common in warmer climates and less common in written languages.

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  2. Warm climates and sonority classes: not simply more vowels and fewer consonantsMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2009 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article adds nuanced findings to the previous generalization that high sonority of the vowel explains its more frequent use in warmer climates. The authors find that “speakers in warm-climate languages make more use of the so-called “sonorant” consonants, that is, consonants with some of the qualities of vowels” (123).

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  3. High CV score: regular rhythm or sonority?Ember, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article is a response to Munroe, Fought, and Fought's comments on a previous study of sonority and climate. Authors suggest that the three indices used by Munroe, Fought, and Fought to measure sonority are not the same contruct and present new results that indicate an association between climate, topography, and vowel index.

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  4. River density and landscape roughness are universal determinants of linguistic diversityAxelsen, Jacob Bock - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 2014 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors investigate the relationship between linguistic diversity and various environmental and spatial variables associated with biodiversity. Most of these variables predict linguistic diversity variably across different continents, and more so within Africa and extended Asia (Asia, the Pacific, and Australia) than within Europe and the Americas. This divide is theorized to be a result of differences in demography and impact of colonialism between the two global regions. However, two environmental factors, landscape roughness and density of river systems, are found to be significant predictors across all global regions. The authors suggest that, as in processes of speciation, rough terrain and watercourses both create physical barriers between which languages can develop in isolation while, in the case of river junctions, also providing transportation routes whereby hybrid languages can occasionally manifest.

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  5. Rhythmicity or sonority: response to ember and ember's "cross-language predictors of consonant-vowel syllables"Munroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents a reanalysis of a previous study on language rhythm and consonant-vowel syllables by Ember and Ember (2000). Communicative efficiency, climate, baby-holding, literacy, and mean number of syllables per word were all considered as factors in consonant-vowel syllable use.

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  6. Cross-language predictors of consonant-vowel syllablesEmber, Melvin - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests predictors of consonant-vowel prevalence cross-culturally. Authors reevaluate the findings of Munroe et. al. (1996) and also test a new variable—baby-holding—for its relationship to CV score. Results suggest that baby-holding is a significant predictor of CV score.

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  7. Climate, econiche, and sexuality: influences on sonority in languageEmber, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on environmental and social explainations for variations in sonority. As expected, results suggest that climate, vegetation density, and sexuality are associated with sonority.

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  8. Drivers of geographical patterns of North American language diversityCuelho, Mario Tulio Pacheco - Proceedings of the Royal Society, 2019 - 8 Hypotheses

    The authors examine multiple ecological variables as possible predictors of language diversity in North America using path analysis, mechanistic simulation modelling, and geographically weighted regression. They conclude that many of the variables do not predict language diversity, but rather are mediated by population density. The authors also find that the variables' ability to predict is not universal across the continent, but rather more regional.

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  9. Climate and the consonant-vowel (CV) syllable: a replication within language familiesMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using a sample of four language families, this paper replicates previous findings on the relationship between consonant-vowel syllable use and climate. An secondary finding on the relationship between consonant-vowel syllable use and writing system was also replicated.

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  10. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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