Found 595 Documents across 60 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Social structure, socialization values, and disciplinary techniques: a cross-cultural analysisPetersen, Larry R. - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the relationship between the use of physical punishment during child socialization and the amount of supervision that adults experience. The authors analyze data using a path analysis which suggests that the greater the valuation of conformity relative to self-reliance, the greater the use of physical punishment during child socialization. Precursors of conformity are also suggested.

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  2. Explaining corporal punishment of children: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2005 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article tests various explainations for corporal punishment of children, including social complexity, a societal culture of violence, and whether help in child rearing is available. Analysis suggests that corporal punishment may be a parent's way to prepare children for societal power inequality.

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  3. The sex of our godsCarroll, Michael P. - Ethos, 1979 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests several hypothesis about predictors of male or female gods. Results suggest a relationship between relative emphasis on female deities and rule of descent.

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  4. Supervision and conformity: a cross-cultural analysis of parental socialization valuesEllis, Godfrey J. - The American Journal of Sociology, 1978 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article investigates child socialization toward obedience and conformity as a function of the supervision that parents experience in their own lives. Measures of economic, familial, political, and religious supervision in parents' lives are examined.

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  5. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  6. Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatural beings: a cross societal studyLambert, William W. - Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1959 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  7. Parental rejection, food deprivation, and personality development: tests of alternative hypothesisRohner, Ronald P. - Ethnology, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates potential relationships between food deprivation, parental rejection, and personality development. Findings indicate that a series of adult personality characteristics (e.g. self evaluation and emotional responsiveness) are better predicted by parental rejection than by nutritional variables.

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  8. The impact of values on development in a cross-cultural sampleZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates relationships between socialization practices, group values, and cultural complexity. Analysis suggests that child-rearing variables and group cohesion in value orientation contribute significantly and independently to cultural complexity.

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  9. Physical punishment of children and wifebeating in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - Child Abuse and Neglect, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author tests Straus' model of wifebeating that suggests that socialization through violence (by encouraging aggression, corporal punishment and by observing violence) increases the likelihood of wifebeating. The relationship between socialization of children using violent techniques and wifebeating is tested using the Probability Sample Files.

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  10. Instrumental and expressive socialization: a false dichotomyHendrix, Lewellyn - Sex Roles, 1985 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study reanalyzes the work of Barry, Bacon and Child (1957) on sex differences in child socialization. The authors use factor analysis to determine if the results of the original study are consistent with results yielded using modern methods and computer analysis. Authors find that there is no one general dimension of male-female difference in socialization and that the conclusions of Barry, Bacon, and Child have little meaning.

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