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  1. Premastication: the second arm of infant and young child feeding for health and survival?Pelto, Gretel H. - Maternal and Child Nutrition, 2009 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study asserts that premastication (the pre-chewing of food for infant feeding) has existed as a cross cultural human universal stemming from the post natal immaturity of infant development and their need to have nutritional supplements to breast milk before they develop the molars necessary to consume an adult diet. Hypotheses are informally tested by sampling 119 cultures from the eHRAf database and looking for frequency of premastication occurrence. About one-third with information on infant feeding mention pre-mastication.

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  2. A Cross-Cultural Nutrition Survey of 118 Societies, Representing the Major Cultural and Geographic Areas of the WorldWhiting, Marjorie Grant - , 1958 - 22 Hypotheses

    Dietary variation has been implicated in population-level heath outcomes such as adult height and infant health. Here the author investigates these relationships in a sample of 118 nonindustrial societies, providing a comparative and quantitative assessment of nutrition and health cross-culturally.

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  3. Cross-cultural factors associated with sexual foreplayGray, J. Patrick - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines reasons for the variation in sexual foreplay practices cross-culturally. Results suggest that exclusive mother-child sleeping arrangements is significantly associated with the presence of foreplay.

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  4. Factors affecting human fertility in nonindustrial societies: a cross-cultural studyNag, Moni - Yale University Publications in Anthropology, 1962 - 13 Hypotheses

    Focusing on 61 preindustrial societies that have information on fertility, the author asks what factors may explain variation in fertility, what devices are used to control fertility, and whether differences in fertility appear to be in line with the societies' environments.

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  5. Woman's workload and infant feeding practices: a relationship with demographic implicationsNerlove, Sara - Ethnology, 1974 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the effect of infant care on women's contribution to subsistence. Results suggest that women who begin supplementary feeding of their infants early participate in subsistence activities to a greater degree than women who begin supplementary feedings later.

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  6. The role of pre-mastication in the evolution of complementary feeding strategies: a bio-cultural analysisZhang, Yuanyuan - , 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    This thesis uses a cross-cultural sample to examine the relationship between anemia and infant feeding practices. Examples from the ethnography are presented. Findings are largely descriptive on practice, but are largely inconclusive with regard to anemia.

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  7. Human lactation, pair-bonds, and alloparents: a cross-cultural analysisQuinlan, Robert J. - Human Nature, 2008 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between pairbonds and lactation, specifically the relationship between pairbond stability, alloparenting, and cross-cultural trends in breastfeeding. Findings show that both conjugal stability and availability of alloparental care are associated with age at weaning.

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  8. Cross-cultural research with matched pairs of societiesBarry III, Herbert - Journal of Social Psychology, 1969 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines 12 matched pairs of closely related societies and suggests that there is a relationship between socialization pressure toward compliance (rather than assertion) and emphasis on food production. Results also indicate that stronger compliance training is associated with higher indulgence in infancy and lower frequency of drunkenness in adulthood.

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  9. A cross-cultural study of aggression and crimeAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 18 Hypotheses

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  10. Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" societiesSellen, Daniel W. - Human Nature, 2001 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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