Found 1107 Documents across 111 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Spousal interdependence, female power, and divorce: A cross-cultural examinationHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the relationship between women's power/status and divorce. Tests of gender variables with measures of divorce highlights the importance of sexual equality in divorce frequency as well as the effect of division of labor on divorce.

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  2. Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adulteryRosenblatt, Paul C. - Journal of Sex Research, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  3. Human lactation, pair-bonds, and alloparents: a cross-cultural analysisQuinlan, Robert J. - Human Nature, 2008 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between pairbonds and lactation, specifically the relationship between pairbond stability, alloparenting, and cross-cultural trends in breastfeeding. Findings show that both conjugal stability and availability of alloparental care are associated with age at weaning.

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  4. Uterine vs. agnatic kinship variability and associated cousin marriage preferences: an evolutionary biological analysisFlinn, Mark V. - Natural Selection and Social Behavior: recent research and new theory, 1981 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study discusses many variables that may influence the direction of altruism within a family. Significant relationships were found between paternity certainty, conjugal instability, marital residence, cross-cousin marriage preferences, and direction of altruistic behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of the mother's brother.

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  5. Divorce and the status of womenPearson, Jr., Willie - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural test of the theory that higher status of women causes higher divorce rates. This theory has typically been expressed in terms of variations in family authority or in terms of women's economic opportunities (375).

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  6. The economics of misbehavior, love and marriage contract enforcementHull, Brooks - Economics Working Papers, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study examines the predictors of arranged marriage versus marriage for love. Several predictions are supported and results uphold the hypothesis that "societies promote the method of marriage contract enforcement best adapted to available production technology, incentives to misbehave, and methods of coercion."

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  7. A human capital-based theory of postmarital residence rulesBaker, Matthew - The Journal of Law, Economics, & Organization, 2006 - 1 Hypotheses

    Authors present a model of optimal postmarital residence rules based on human capital investments made before marriage. Implications of this model are tested cross-culturally. Environmental, subsistence, economic, and social variables are considered as predictors of postmarital residence patterns.

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  8. Evolutionary ecology of human pair-bonds: cross-cultural tests of alternative hypothesesQuinlan, Robert J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests three hypotheses on the evolution of the human pair-bond: male-provisioning, male mating competition, and the defense of offspring from other males. Findings indicate that male provisioning and mating competition are factors in the development of the pair-bond. Additional findings indicate that alloparentling, polygyny, and equal contribution to subsistence by each sex contribute to the security of the pair-bond.

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  9. A comparative study of slave societiesPryor, Frederic L. - Journal of Comparative Economics, 1977 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that slavery is an inevitable stage in society's economic development. The author rejects this hypothesis; he argues that there are two main types of slavery (slaves for economic capital or social capital) and each type has its own set of social and politcal determinants. Overall, the power dynamic between husbands and wives is thought to be a key predictor of slavery.

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  10. Affiliations: Structural Determinants of Differential Divorce RatesAckerman, Charles - American Journal of Sociology, 1963 - 4 Hypotheses

    Ackerman performs a cross-cultural analysis on the structural determinants of divorce rate as originally hypothesized by Max Gluckman and elaborated on by other researchers. Ackerman's results suggest that when spouses share a network of affiliation, divorce rates are low; when spouses maintain separate affiliations, divorce rates are high. Ackerman's statistical analysis and discussion provide an explanatory framework for further research.

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