Found 909 Documents across 91 Pages (0.017 seconds)
  1. Marriage systems and pathogen stress in human societiesLow, Bobbi S. - American Zoologist, 1990 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between pathogen stress and polygyny. Results indicate that there is a positive association between the two that is not confounded by geographic region, latitude, population density, male-male competition, or presence of brideprice. In particular, pathogen stress precicts higher levels of non-sororal polygyny and capturing women for wives or concubines.

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  2. Rethinking polygyny: co-wives, codes, and cultural systemsWhite, Douglas R. - Current Anthropology, 1988 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article "focuses on internal relationships in the organization of polygynous systems." The author presents new codes for polygyny and tests hypotheses regarding "complexes" of polygynous variables: wealth-increasing polygyny and sororal polygyny. It is asserted that polygyny is produced by a variety of factors and circumstances, and that regional historical, demographic, and ecological forces require attention in order to understand its acceptance and practice.

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  3. Explaining monogamy and polygyny among foragers and horticulturalistsHooper, Paul L. - , 2006 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article tests several hypotheses related to the presence or absence of polygyny. Results suggest a negative relationship between polygyny and male provisioning, and positive relationships between polygyny and warfare, interpersonal aggression, and pathogen stress.

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  4. The mating system of foragers in the standard cross-cultural sampleMarlowe, Frank W. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines variation in polygyny among foragers. Empirical analysis suggests that the level of male provisioning influences mating systems: higher male contribution to subsistence is associated with monogamy. The influences of pathogen stress, male-male competition, and male coercion are also considered.

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  5. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  6. A Cross-Cultural Summary: PolygynyTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 21 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  7. Form of marriage, sexual division of labor, and postmarital residence in cross-cultural perspective: a reconsiderationKorotayev, Andrey V. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the determinants of post marital residence, particularly female contribution to subsistence. This study suggests in contrast to previous research that female contribution to subsistence does predict residence if non-sororal polygyny, and internal warfare are controlled. Theoretical perspectives on how marriage system affects the relationship between residence and contribution to subsistence are discussed.

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  8. Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold modelRoss, Cody T. - Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  9. Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differencesLow, Bobbi S. - International Journal of Contemporary Sociology, 1990 - 15 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  10. Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfareWhite, Douglas R. - American Anthropologist, 1988 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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