Found 841 Documents across 85 Pages (0.048 seconds)
  1. Cousin termsGoody, Jack - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

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  2. Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspectiveAberle, David F. - Matrilineal Kinship, 1961 - 15 Hypotheses

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  3. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  4. Terminological correlates of cross-cousin marriageCoult, Allan D. - Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkendunde, 1965 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines Crow and Omaha kinship terminologies, cross-cousin marriage practices, and descent rules. Several hypotheses relating these three variables are tested.

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  5. Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practicesAlford, Richard - , 1987 - 14 Hypotheses

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

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  6. Patterns of sibling terminologyMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the distribution and diffusion of the seven patterns of sibling classifaction given by the author. The author then studies the association between descent and sibling terminology.

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  7. Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples of Murdock's DataRudmin, Floyd Webster - Journal of Socio-Economics, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  8. Avunculocality and incest: the development of unilateral cross-cousin marriage and Crow-Omaha kinship systemsEyde, David B. - American Anthropologist, 1961 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the relationship between Crow kinship terminology and avunculocality. Results indicate that if matrilateral cross-cousin marriage is associated with Crow kinship systems, then societies that are avunculocal are more likely have Crow systems.

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  9. Levi-Strauss and empirical inquiryKobben, A. J. F. - Ethnology, 1974 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper tests some of Levi-Strauss's pronouncements on Crow-Omaha kinship systems cross-culturally. The author tests the relationships between Crow-Omaha and Hawaiian kinship systems and cross-cousin marriage. Results suggest that both kinship systems will prohibit cross-cousin marriage.

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  10. Warless societies and the origin of warKelly, Raymond C. - , 2000 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book examines the difference between warless and warlike societies and attempts to determine the point at which a society becomes warlike. The author suggests that differences between warless and warlike societies are mostly organizational and hypothesizes that "unsegmented" societies, or societies that have a weaker sense of group identity and cohesion, will be more likely to be warless than "segmented" societies. Several tests are presented. Results generally support the hypothesis.

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