Found 683 Documents across 69 Pages (0.046 seconds)
  1. Social resilience to climate-related disasters in ancient societies: a test of two hypothesesPeregrine, Peter N. - , 2017 - 2 Hypotheses

    In the present study, Peregrine tests two perspectives regarding social resilience to climate-related disasters: 1) that societies with more inclusive and participatory political structures (corporate political strategies) are more resilient to climate-related disasters, and 2) that societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to climate-related disasters. Results support the notion that societies with greater political participation are more socially resilient to catastrophic climate-related disasters. Because these results are justifiably generalizable across multiple historical and cultural contexts, Peregrine's findings are a useful contribution to aid in disaster response policy decision making.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. The democraticness of traditional political systems in AfricaNeupert-Wentz, Clara - Democratization, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    Using a new expert survey, the authors explore the democraticness of traditional political systems (TPS) in 159 ethnic groups in Africa. Their initial analysis finds that measures of public preference input and political process control are particularly strong contributors to the degree that a society may develop democracy in their TPS. They also find that societies with powerful elders are more likely to be democratic, while more hierarchically organized political systems and those with kings, chiefs, and segmentary lineages are less likely.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Some political aspects of craft specializationPeregrine, Peter N. - World Archaeology, 1991 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the reasons behind advances in craft specialization particularly why there is a relationship between advances in craft specialization and the emergence of powerful elites. Hypothesis tests focused on political centralization.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian SocietiesPeregrine, Peter N. - Disaster Prevention and Management, 2017 - 7 Hypotheses

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Is Mary Douglas's Grid/Group Analysis Useful for Cross-Cultural Research?Caulkins, D. Douglas - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this article, the researcher aims to test the usefulness of grid/group theory, developed by anthropologist Mary Douglas, for cross-cultural research. The article utilizes principal component factor analysis on grid/group indicators to test if "grid" and "group" can be considered as sufficiently independent factors, and thus useful for quantitative cross-cultural research.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Pathways to social inequalityHaynie, Hannah J. - Evolutionary Human Sciences, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors examine pathways to social inequality, specifically social class hierarchy, in 408 non-industrial societies. In a path model, they find social class hierarchy to be directly associated with increased population size, intensive agriculture and large animal husbandry, real property inheritance (unigeniture) and hereditary political succession, with an overall R-squared of 0.45. They conclude that a complex web of effects consisting of environmental variables, mediated by resource intensification, wealth transmission variables, and population size all shape social inequality.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Reducing post-disaster conflict: a cross cultural test of four hypotheses using archaeological dataPeregrine, Peter N. - Environmental Hazards, 2018 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article uses pre-defined criteria to sample 22 archaeological climate-related disasters from 9 distinct regions from eHRAF Archaeology. It quantitatively tests four hypotheses regarding change in conflict following climate-related disasters using multiple regression analyses and backwards stepwise regression. Findings demonstrate association between political strategy/authority decision making and degree of post climate disaster conflict.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Social structure, socialization values, and disciplinary techniques: a cross-cultural analysisPetersen, Larry R. - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the relationship between the use of physical punishment during child socialization and the amount of supervision that adults experience. The authors analyze data using a path analysis which suggests that the greater the valuation of conformity relative to self-reliance, the greater the use of physical punishment during child socialization. Precursors of conformity are also suggested.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Network strategy and warPeregrine, Peter N. - Alternative Pathways to Complexity: Households, Markets, World Systems, and Political Economy: Essays Honoring the Legacy of Richard E. Blanton - 3 Hypotheses

    This article draws from previous research by Ember and Ember (1992) that suggests a relationship between socialization for mistrust in others, unpredictable natural disasters, and warfare frequency. Authors hypothesize that the inclusion of a corporate-network strategy variable will improve the predictive power of the Embers' model for warfare. Results support this hypothesis.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Warfare, atrocities, and political participation: eastern AfricaEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Aggression, Conflict, and Peace Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    The present study attempts to replicate the Ember, Ember, and Russett (1992) worldwide finding that fighting rarely occurs between democracies in a sample of eastern African societies. Following the earlier study, the authors considered internal warfare to be an analog of international warfare and measures of political participation analogous to democracy. The researchers also explore if there is an association between political participation and committing atrocities. Contrary to past findings, internal warfare was not predicted by the same set of variables as the 1992 study, but there is an inverse relationship between committing atrocities and political participation. However, when additional variables were added, internal warfare was significantly predicted by less political participation.

    Related DocumentsCite