Found 801 Documents across 81 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. Where do cultures come from?Kanazawa, Satoshi - Cross-Cultural Research, 2006 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article explores how the evolutionary psychological perspective explains cultural universals and variations. This framework is then used to test whether wealth affects parents' preferences of sons or daughters on an individual and national level. Results suggest that wealthier individuals and wealthier nations prefer sons to daughters.

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  2. Status of the elderly: an extension of the theoryIshii-Kuntz, Masako - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article reassesses the cross-cultural work on status of the elderly and tests two additional variables, socialization values and ancestor worship, as predictors of the status of the elderly.

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  3. Respect for the elderly in preindustrial societies as related to their activityMcArdle, Joan L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1981 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between respect for the elderly and their socially valued activities. Support is found for this association under certain conditions: it is significant with independent families in societies with no belief in a single god and absence of slavery. Theories of disengagement and activity among the elderly are also discussed, and the authors propose that they be considered as a continuum.

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  4. Family structure and the status of the elderly: a preliminary empirical studyLee, Gary R. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines the status of the elderly cross-culturally, proposing that familial complexity, unlineal descent, and unilocal residence are predictors of high status. The authors theorize that elderly male status will be highest in patrilineal and patrilocal societies; elderly female status will be highest in matrilineal and matrilocal societies. Some support is found for these patterns, but the authors ultimately regard them as too simple to adequately predict status of the elderly.

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  5. The myth of the golden isle: old age in pre-industrial societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Selected Papers Volume of the 8th International Congress of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study discusses the distribution of the treatment of the aged across a sample of pre-industrial societies. Data illustrate that the elderly were treated in a non-supportive or death-hastening manner in the majority of societies, dispelling the notion that a golden age/isle existed in pre-industrial societies in which the elderly were revered and supported. Results also suggest a relationship between age and treatment of the elderly and climate, social, and subsistence variables and the treatment of the aged.

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  6. Decrepitude and death-hastening: the nature of old age in third world societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Studies in Third World Societies, 1982 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the status and treatment of the elderly in non-industrial societies. Associations are found between social complexity, subsistence type, and the status and treatment of the elderly.

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  7. Status of the elderly: economic and familial antecedentsLee, Gary R. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how status of the elderly is affected by economic type, family organization, inheritance of real property, and unilocal residence patterns. Multivariate analysis ultimately suggests that agricultural economy, patrilocal residence, and fully extended family systems are significant predictors of higher status of the elderly. No major gender differences were discovered.

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  8. Tracking Cross-Cultural Gender Bias in ReputationsPost, Emily R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2020 - 6 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors examine the effects of social structure, specifically descent and residence, on areas of female reputation. Additionally, they examine the effect of the author's gender on the instances of female reputation included in ethnographic texts.

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  9. Matri-patrilocality and the birth of the first childWilson, Suzanne F. - Being Female: Reproduction, Power and Change, 1975 - 2 Hypotheses

    The goal of this paper is two-fold: first, a review of some of the suggestions that anthropologists have made to improve classifications of residence is presented. Second, matri-patrilocality is examined in order to illustrate the importance of considering life cycle events in interpretations of residence patterns.

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  10. Information and esteem: cultural considerations in the treatment of the agedMaxwell, Robert J. - Aging and Human Development, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the treatment of the aged in different societies. Support was found for the hypothesis that the amount information controlled by the aged is positively associated with the degree of esteem in which they are held by other members of the society.

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