Found 625 Documents across 63 Pages (0.012 seconds)
  1. The power of religionBentzen, Jeanet Sinding - Journal of Economic Growth, 2022 - 6 Hypotheses

    This paper seeks to understand the extent to which religion has been used to legitimize political power in the past, and the extent to which that carries into contemporary institutions. The authors seek to demonstrate that there is a strong link between the stratification of societies in the past and the presence of autocracies in many of those same areas today. They make their case by putting forward, and testing, three linked theories -- first, that stratified societies are more likely to develop religions based on moralizing high gods as a means of divine legitimization, second, that the societies that used religion for legitimacy in their past are more likely to have religion embedded in their institutions today, and third, that societies that used religion for legitimacy in the past are more likely to be autocracies today.

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  2. Christianity and democracy: a cross-cultural study (afterthoughts)Korotayev, Andrey V. - World Cultures, 2002 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study proposes that polygyny, unilineal descent organization and large extended families could be regarded as universal negative predictors of communal democracy. Crosstabulations show that Christianity is positively associated with communal democracy and negatively associated with polygyny, and thus the authors suggest that Christianity influenced the development of democracy in Europe through its discouraging of polygyny and unilineal descent organization.

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  3. Consanguinity as a Major Predictor of Levels of Democracy: A Study of 70 NationsWoodley, Michael A. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 2013 - 7 Hypotheses

    While it is widely accepted that there are a multitude of variables that contribute to a society’s level of democracy, the authors of this study argue that the prevalence of consanguinity is one that is often overlooked. Using a sample of 70 nations, they tested the relationship between consanguinity (defined as marriage and subsequent mating between second cousins or closer relatives) and level of democracy (defined by both the Polity IV scale and the EIU Index) and found a significant negative relationship. Similarly, when controlled for a host of different variables in multiple regression analysis, the significant relationship between consanguinity and level of democracy held true.

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  4. The status of women in preindustrial societiesWhyte, Martin King - , 1978 - 23 Hypotheses

    This book is concerned with explaining variation in the status of women. The author, after measuring over 50 aspects of status, first concludes that status is not a unitary concept. Therefore the author looks at 10 different domains of status. Many traditional explanations are not supported; most support is found for the influence of social complexity which generally lowers female status.

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  5. Pre‐colonial ethnic institutions and contemporary African developmentMichalopoulos, Stelios - Econometrica, 2013 - 1 Hypotheses

    The researchers test the relationship between political complexity among African pre-colonial ethnic institutions and contemporary economic performance (using light-density data as a proxy). Their tests yield a robust positive association even after controlling for multiple alternative geographic, cultural, and economic variables, which they interpret as underscoring the ongoing importance of ethnic-specific institutions in shaping economic activity in contemporary Africa.

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  6. Early Statehood and Support for Autocratic Rule in AfricaChlouba, Vladimir - Comparative Political Studies, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors of this article evaluate how the legacies of early statehood (i.e., precolonial centralized ethnic groups) in Africa continue to impact democratic governance. They find a positive relationship between early states and support for autocratic rule, especially in former British colonies that were highly centralized prior to colonization. They suggest that the transmission of political and cultural norms play an important role in the support for autocracies.

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  7. Explaining divergence in the long-term effects of precolonial centralization on access to public infrastructure services in NigeriaArchibong, Belinda - World Development, 2019 - 8 Hypotheses

    This study investigates previous findings that indicate precolonial centralization was beneficial for development in Africa. Using new survey data from public primary schools, the author shows that the failure of leaders of centralized regions to comply with federal regimes was punished with underinvestment in public infrastructure services, hindering development and limiting access to these services in recent populations. The author proposes that the extent to which precolonial centralization was beneficial for development in Africa is mediated by compliance of the local governing bodies with federal regimes.

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  8. The modern impact of precolonial centralization in AfricaGennaioli, Nicola - Journal of Economic Growth, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors empirically assess the relationship between precolonial centralization and the implementation of modernization programs by African governments. Their findings indicate that current African countries tend to have better provisioning of public goods (including better access to education, healthcare, and infrastructure) when their ethnic groups' precolonial institutions were more centralized.

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  9. The democraticness of traditional political systems in AfricaNeupert-Wentz, Clara - Democratization, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    Using a new expert survey, the authors explore the democraticness of traditional political systems (TPS) in 159 ethnic groups in Africa. Their initial analysis finds that measures of public preference input and political process control are particularly strong contributors to the degree that a society may develop democracy in their TPS. They also find that societies with powerful elders are more likely to be democratic, while more hierarchically organized political systems and those with kings, chiefs, and segmentary lineages are less likely.

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  10. Which groups fight? Customary institutions and communal conflicts in AfricaWig, Tore - Journal of Peace Research, 2018 - 2 Hypotheses

    In an attempt to explain communal conflict, this study investigated how customary institutions (i.e. legislatures, courts, and chiefs) may impact the communal conflict activity of groups in Africa. The authors suggest that customary authorities act as local enforcements to mitigate within-group conflict, therefore a higher number of customary institutions should decrease communal conflict. Using data from 143 politically relevant ethnic groups, the authors showed support for their hypothesis and demonstrated marginal support that more inclusive customary institutions would be associated with less communal conflict.

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