Found 852 Documents across 86 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of cultureBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Suppl., 1965 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  2. Relation of child training to subsistence economyBarry III, Herbert - American Anthropologist, 1959 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the relationship between child training and certain variables, such as economy.

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  3. A cross-cultural study of drunkennessDavis, William N. - , 1964 - 18 Hypotheses

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  4. Self-assertion, sex role, and vocal raspErickson, Edwin E. - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the relationship between singing behavior, specifically vocal rasp, and sex-role differences. Results suggest that conformity training is negatively associated with the use of vocal rasp. Results also suggest that women are more likely to sing with vocal rasp in societies where they make a more significant contribution to subsistence.

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  5. Sociocultural aspects of alcohol addictionBarry III, Herbert - The Addictive States, 1968 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines cultural variation in alcoholism with a particular focus on the role of imperialist contact. Cultural prohibition of alcohol and child-rearing variables are also considered. Several hypotheses are supported.

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  6. The dependency-conflict hypothesis and the frequency of drunkennessBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1974 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study is a reexamination of Bacon's (1965) previous cross-cultural study regarding drinking. The current study supports the dependency-conflict hypothesis that frequency of drunkenness is related to dependency needs in childhood and adulthood.

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  7. Effects of infantile stimulation on musical behaviorAyres, Barbara - Folk Song Style and Culture, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This chapter tests the influences of physiological stressors during infancy on different aspects of musical behavior. Findings suggest that songs in societies where infantile stress is practiced will be characterized by stronger accents and a wider range.

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  8. Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatural beings: a cross societal studyLambert, William W. - Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1959 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  9. Folk song style and cultureLomax, Alan - , 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    A large-scale comparative study of folk songs around the world employing systematic measures (cantometrics). The aim was not just to describe variation but to test hypotheses about the relationships between song style and societal structures. Dance was also considered.

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  10. A cross-cultural study of drinking: iii. sex differencesChild, Irvin L. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1965 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines sex differences in alcohol consumption, suggesting that they are related to a nomadic or rural settlement, low accumulation of food resources, and strong child training pressure toward achievement. The authors suggest that societal norms often limit drunkenness in women because women's responsibilities (such as childcare) would deter incapacity due to intoxication.

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