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  1. Solidarity, stratification and sentiment: the unilateral cross-cousin marriage according to the theories of levi-strauss, leach, and homans and schneiderBerting, J. - Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 1960 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests differing theories of why a man's marriage of his mother's brother's daughter is often encouraged while marriage of the father's sister's daughter is discouraged. Maintenance of relationships between bride-givers and bride takers is considered, as are the role of childhood sentiments in choosing a spouse.

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  2. Uterine vs. agnatic kinship variability and associated cousin marriage preferences: an evolutionary biological analysisFlinn, Mark V. - Natural Selection and Social Behavior: recent research and new theory, 1981 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study discusses many variables that may influence the direction of altruism within a family. Significant relationships were found between paternity certainty, conjugal instability, marital residence, cross-cousin marriage preferences, and direction of altruistic behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of the mother's brother.

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  3. Marriage, authority, and final causes: a study of unilateral cross-cousin marriageHomans, George C. - Sentiments & Activities, 1962 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors review and provide an alternative to Levi-Strauss's theory on unilateral cross-cousin marriage. Levi-Strauss theorized that matrilateral cross-cousin marriage (males marrying their maternal uncles' daughters) occurs more than the patrilateral form because the former promotes more "roundabout" woman-giving and overall social solidarity. He also states that the form of cross-cousin marriage does not depend on kinship linearity. In contrast, the present authors hypothesize that, among societies with unilateral cross-cousin marriage, patrilineal societies will have matrilateral cross-cousin marriage and matrilineal societies will have the patrilateral form. To justify their prediction, the authors point to the close, informal relationships fostered between males and their maternal uncles in patrilineal societies and between males and their paternal aunts in matrilineal societies.

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  4. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  5. A preliminary study of cross-sexual joking relationships in primitive societyBrant, Charles S. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 4 Hypotheses

    The author analyzes the association between joking behavior and four types of instutionalized potential marriage relationships. Results show a tendency for a joking relationship to occur in all cases.

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  6. A Cross-Cultural Summary: PolygynyTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 21 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  7. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

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  8. Avunculocality and incest: the development of unilateral cross-cousin marriage and Crow-Omaha kinship systemsEyde, David B. - American Anthropologist, 1961 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the relationship between Crow kinship terminology and avunculocality. Results indicate that if matrilateral cross-cousin marriage is associated with Crow kinship systems, then societies that are avunculocal are more likely have Crow systems.

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  9. Causal inferences concerning inheritance and propertyGoody, Jack - Human Relations, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper examines diverging devolution—the transmission of property to both males and females—and its predictors and consequences. Particular attention is paid to kinship terminology and control of women’s marriage. Multiple hypotheses are supported.

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  10. Parental choice: what parents want in a son-in-law and a daughter-in-law across 67 pre-industrial societiesApostolou, Menelaos - British Journal of Psychology, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines differences in parental preference of potential in-laws across cultures. Results suggest that parents look for traits that will benefit themselves and their kin and that gender and subsistence type affects the traits that parents deem most important.

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