Found 915 Documents across 92 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Dowry as female competitionGaulin, Steven J.C. - American Anthropologist, 1990 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests two models that predict the presence of dowry cross-culturally: the female competition model and the labor-value model. Results suggest that both models are predictive of dowry, however discriminant analysis finds the female competition model to be superior.

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  2. Parental certainty, subsistence and inheritance revisitedGray, J. Patrick - Journal of Human Evolution, 1981 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the results of a study (Gaulin 1980) on male parental certainty and subsistence type. Methodological errors are assessed and the hypotheses are retested.

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  3. Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african societiesRomanoff, Steven - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 12 Hypotheses

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  4. Sexual dimorphism in stature and women's work: a phylogenetic cross-cultural analysisHolden, Clare - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1999 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a phylogenetic approach to studying sexual dimorphism of stature. Results show a significant association between sexual division of labor and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  5. Paternal confidence and paternal investment: a cross cultural test of a sociobiological hypothesisGaulin, Steven J.C. - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1980 - 2 Hypotheses

    Using paternal investment theory, the authors examine the relationship between paternal confidence and paternal investment in humans.

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  6. Height and sexual dimorphism of stature among human societiesGray, J. Patrick - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between sexual dimorphism of stature and variables of marriage, diet, subsistence and environment. Significant associations were found between security and plentifulness of food supply, protein availability, and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  7. Alliances and ritual ecstasy: human responses to resource stressHayden, Brian - Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 1987 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article hypothesizes that ritual ecstasy was selected for as a way for hunter-gatherers to cope with resource uncertainty by unifying separate groups. Results support this hypothesis and suggest a relationship between resource stress and deities as well as dependence on animals and presence of zoomorphic deities.

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  8. Longevity Among Hunter-Gatherers: A Cross-Cultural ExaminationGurven, Michael - Population and Development Review, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to reevaluate the widespread assumption that hunter-gatherers lack the longevity that people in the modern, industrialized world enjoy. Through modeling life expectancy, mortality, and other demographic trends among extant hunter-gatherer, gatherer-horticulturalists, and horticulturalists societies they are able to challenge this belief. The authors conclude that longevity is a "novel feature of Homo sapiens" and that seven decades seems to be the natural lifespan of a human.

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  9. The role of the father: an anthropological perspectiveKatz, Mary Maxwell - The Role of the Father in Child Development, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the relationship between male parental behavior and influences of species, ecological and social factors. The authors first present a cross-phylogenetic perspective on paternal differences between species, then offer two quantitative studies: a comparative study of non-western human societies that correlates father-infant proximity with socioecological factors and another about father-infant proximity among the !Kung.

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  10. Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalistsBerbesque, J. Colette - Biology Letters, 2014 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

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