Found 768 Documents across 77 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. The status of women in preindustrial societiesWhyte, Martin King - , 1978 - 23 Hypotheses

    This book is concerned with explaining variation in the status of women. The author, after measuring over 50 aspects of status, first concludes that status is not a unitary concept. Therefore the author looks at 10 different domains of status. Many traditional explanations are not supported; most support is found for the influence of social complexity which generally lowers female status.

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  2. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  3. Economic systems of foragersPryor, Frederic L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates five different economic types of foragers: classic, transitional system, politically oriented, economically oriented, and intangibles-oriented. The author asserts that these economic types “are not mere epiphenomena of the oft-discussed social structural or political forces but, rather, are special characteristics that must be independently taken into account” (418). A myriad of environmental, subsistence, political, and social variables are examined: some differed significantly across the five economic types of foragers, but others such as famine threat, conflict, locational fixity, marital form, and postmarital residence did not differ between types.

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  4. Ecological determinants of women's status among hunter/gatherersHayden, Brian - Human Evolution, 1986 - 4 Hypotheses

    A materialist approach is used to study the status of women in hunter-gatherer groups. Techno-ecological factors are tested as predictors of women's status.

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  5. A glorious warrior in war: Cross-cultural evidence of honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflictNawata, Kengo - Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 2019 - 4 Hypotheses

    Research sampled 143 societies from the Standard Cross Cultural Sample to test the relationship between honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflicts. Using mediation analysis based on multiple regression, and structural equation modeling, the research supported the theory that honor culture was positively associated with intergroup conflict, and that this relationship was mediated by social rewards for warriors.

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  6. Sex differences in sports across 50 societiesDeaner, Robert. O - Cross-Cultural Research, 2013 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines sex differences in sports and games of strategy and chance. Results indicated large differences in participation by gender, especially for combat and hunting sports and in patriarchal societies. The possible cross-cultural universality of this trend is discussed.

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  7. Societal isolation, violent norms, and gender relations: a reexamination and extension of levinson's model of wife beatingErchak, Gerald M. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1994 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article is a re-examination of Levinson's 1989 model of wife beating. Associations between social complexity, cultural support for violence, women's status, and wife beating are tested.

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  8. Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatizationYoung, Frank W. - , 1965 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  9. Cross-cultural studies of women and the male bias problemWhyte, Martin King - Behavior science resesarch, 1978 - 2 Hypotheses

    A feminist critique of ethnographic information is tested to determine if the gender of fieldworkers or coders has a significant effect on the reliability of data regarding women's status. Findings indicate that there is no male bias in coding. With regard to male versus female ethnographers, only a few results (no more than chance) found any evidence of possible bias, but they are all in the same direction with female ethnographers more favorable. Author suggests that any bias will be lessened by using more specific coding scales.

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  10. Female power and male dominance: on the origins sexual inequalitySanday, Peggy Reeves - , 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This book explores the factors that affect sexual inequality. The author first focuses on the symbolic representations of a culture's "sex-role plan," or how male and female power is scripted in different societies. The author then tests the relationships bewteen sexual inequality and variables like subsistence strategy, division of labor, and menstrual and sex taboos. The bases of female power and the rise of male dominance are also discussed.

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