Found 809 Documents across 81 Pages (0.054 seconds)
  1. Managing infidelity: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 2002 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on spousal responses to extramarital affairs cross-culturally. Results suggest that men and women are equally concerned with the sexual activities of their spouses, however, tactics used in response to infidelity vary by gender. Results also show a relationship between social complexity and responses to infidelity.

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  2. Individual and societal response to sexual betrayal: a view from around the worldJankowiak, William - Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality, 2007 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests several hypotheses that men and women are differentially invested in their partner's sexual fidelity. Using a cross-cultural sample authors analyze women's and men's responses to sexual infidelity.

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  3. Extramarital sex norms in cross-cultural perspectiveBroude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines the double standard regarding extramarital norms for men and women in relation to other sociocultural factors. Results suggest that a double standard is significantly related to post-partum sex taboos, hypermasculinity, and father absence.

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  4. Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous responseScelza, B. A. - Nature Human Behavior, 2019 - 6 Hypotheses

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  5. Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adulteryRosenblatt, Paul C. - Journal of Sex Research, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  6. Cross-cultural evaluation of predicted associations between race and behaviorPeregrine, Peter N. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests Rushton's hypothesis that there is a relationship between "race" (Negroid, Caucasoid, and Mongoloid) and various aspects of behavior. Results do not support this hypothesis.

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  7. Individual Mate Choice in an Arranged Marriage Context: Evidence from the Standard Cross-cultural SampleApostolou, Menelaos - Evolutionary Psychological Science, 2017 - 14 Hypotheses

    The author performs tests of hypothesized relationships between arranged marriage and various forms of non-sanctioned mate choice. Overall, the author theorizes that where marriages are arranged, mate choice will be found in higher prevalence of premarital sex, extramarital sex, and rape. Most tests support these relationships in the hypothesized directions, suggesting that strict regulation of marriage provides parents with some, but far from complete control over the mate choice of their offspring.

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  8. Sexual equality and romantic love: a reanalysis of rosenblatt's study on the function of romantic lovede Munck, Victor C. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 6 Hypotheses

    Based on work by Rosenblatt (1966), this article tests a hypothesis relating sexual freedom to romantic love. Findings suggest a relationship between premarital and extramarital sexual permissiveness equality for women and men and romantic love.

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  9. The cultural contribution to jealousy: cross-cultural aggression in sexual jealousy situationsHupka, Ralph B. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1990 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between social structures and sexual jealousy. Results suggest that social structures that emphasize the importance of pair-bonding, progeny, personal property, and exclusive marital sex relations are associated with sexual jealousy in males.

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  10. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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