Found 906 Documents across 91 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Conflicting loyalties theory: a cross-cultural testKang, Gay Elizabeth - Ethnology, 1976 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests the conflicting loyalties theory that predicts feuding will be absent when multiple allegiances are present. The author tests this theory using variables that are believed to establish cross-cutting loyalties, such as exogamy and cousin marriage. Several hypotheses are tested, none are supported.

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  2. Social structure and conflict: Evidence from sub-Saharan AfricaMoscona, Jacob - Working paper, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using a sample of 145 African societies, the authors seek to examine the relationship between segmentary lineage organization and conflict. Presented is evidence supporting the claim that segmentary lineage societies are more prone to conflict and to conflicts larger in scale and duration. The authors aim to contribute to a better understanding of the determinants of conflict, and additionally address the applicability of the present study beyond Africa.

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  3. Does Art Bring Us Together? An Empirical Approach to the Evolutionary Aesthetics of Ellen DissanayakeFullerton, Brady - Biological Theory, 2020 - 6 Hypotheses

    In this study, the author empirically tests a formulation of Ellen Dissanayake's evolutionary theory of art, which argues that art evolved to promote group cohesion. The hypotheses derived from this theory and tested in this study specifically focus on ritual art and its relationships to various proxies for group cohesion such as community conflict and internal warfare. Results show that the presence of ritual art is significantly higher where certain measures of group cohesion are also higher (including lower internal warfare, lower conflict between communities of the same society, and lower frequency of violent conflict between groups within local communities).

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  4. Comments on Divale and Harris's 'population, warfare, and the male supremacist complex'Kang, Gay Elizabeth - Behavior Science Research, 1979 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article offers a critique of the study by Divale and Harris (1976).

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  5. Warless and warlike hunter-gatherers: a comparisonKelly, Robert L. - Warless Societies and the Origin of War, 2000 - 7 Hypotheses

    This book examines the characteristics of warlike and warless foraging societies, as well as the transitional stages that occur when a society becomes warlike. Several predicted correlates of warfare frequency are supported.

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  6. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  7. Peace between participatory polities: a cross-cultural test of the "democracies rarely fight each other" hypothesisEmber, Carol R. - World Politics, 1992 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests the effects of variables associated with political participation on the frequency of internal warfare. Findings suggest support for the hypothesis that democracies rarely fight each other.

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  8. The nature of exogamy in relation to cross-allegiance/alliance of social unitsKang, Gay Elizabeth - Behavior Science Research, 1979 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests a common theory that predicts a positive relationship between exogamy and cross-allegiances between social units. Results did not support this prediction. Cross-allegiances were only weakly related to cross-cousin marriage.

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  9. Which groups fight? Customary institutions and communal conflicts in AfricaWig, Tore - Journal of Peace Research, 2018 - 2 Hypotheses

    In an attempt to explain communal conflict, this study investigated how customary institutions (i.e. legislatures, courts, and chiefs) may impact the communal conflict activity of groups in Africa. The authors suggest that customary authorities act as local enforcements to mitigate within-group conflict, therefore a higher number of customary institutions should decrease communal conflict. Using data from 143 politically relevant ethnic groups, the authors showed support for their hypothesis and demonstrated marginal support that more inclusive customary institutions would be associated with less communal conflict.

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  10. Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral SystemsEnke, Benjamin - The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2019 - 10 Hypotheses

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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