Found 892 Documents across 90 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. The division of labor by sex and other gender-related variables: an exploratory studyBroude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1990 - 7 Hypotheses

    Drawing on various theories regarding the sexual division of labor, Broude examines the relationship between task differentiation by sex and gender-related behaviors/customs.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Social organization, spousal resources, and marital power: a cross-cultural studyWarner, Rebecca L. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the effect of family structural complexity, residence and descent system, and female contribution to subsistence on women's power in marriage. Results suggest that wives have more power in marriage where there is nuclear family organization and matrilocality. The authors suggest that resource theory should broaden its conception of valued resources to include dimensions such as family organization patterns.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Wife-husband intimacy and female status in cross-cultural perspectivede Munck, Victor C. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines predictors of intimacy between husbands and wives. Emphasis is on equality of spouses. A causal model is presented.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Female allies and female power a cross-cultural analysisYanca, Catherine - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2004 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests the various ecological and social influences of women's political power and resource control in polygynous societies cross-culturally. Results suggest that women who are closer to their kin and have sisters as cowives are more likely to have resource control and power.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Same-sex competition and sexual conflict expressed through witchcraft accusationsPeacey, Sarah - Scientific Reports, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors analyze relationships between witchcraft accusations and the gender of the accused. They find that men are most often accused of witchcraft in their sample of 54 Bantu or Bantoid societies, and are particularly more likely to be accused of witchcraft by unrelated or blood-related individuals or in disputes over wealth or prestige. On the other hand, women are more likely to be accused of witchcraft in affinal relationships, particularly husbands and co-wives, and in situations related to fertility or relationships. Elderly women were also more likely to be accused of witchcraft than elderly men. The authors also examined outcomes of witchcraft accusations, finding that 81% of cases resulted in a negative outcome for the accused. They suggest that competition underlies accusations of witchcraft.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. The socio-cultural context of rape: a cross-cultural studySanday, Peggy Reeves - Journal of Social Issues, 1981 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article offers an analysis of the rape of women cross-culturally, positing that rape is present under certain cultural circumstances. The author tests for correlations between rape and aspects of sexual repression, group violence, childrearing, and ideologies of male dominance. There are significant associations between male sexual violence and other types of violence, as well as between rape and ideologies of male dominance.

    Related DocumentsCite