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  1. Male genital mutilation: an adaptation to sexual conflictWilson, Christopher G. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2008 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article examines the "sexual conflict" hypothesis which predicts that male genital mutilation should be associated with polygyny and a reduction in the frequency of extramarital sex. Male genital mutilation (MGM) rituals should be highly public and facilitate access to social benefits. Support for these assumptions is provided.

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  2. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  3. Correlates of the long post-partum taboo: a cross-cultural studySaucier, Jean-Francois - Current Anthropology, 1972 - 13 Hypotheses

    This study investigates correlates of the post-partum sex taboo. Empirical analysis identifies several predictors, from extensive agriculture to localized kin groups. The authors suggest that the taboo imposes a burden on women and unmarried or monogamous young men, and it is best maintained in a community in which elders are in firm control and married women are considered outsiders due to village exogamy.

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  4. Revisiting status-envy: does the theory hold up?Broude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    Author first tests the validity of the variables traditionallyused in tests of status envy theory. Then the author tests some of the implications of the theory and proposes somewhat different mechanisms.

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  5. Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behaviorMinturn, Leigh - Ethnology, 1969 - 12 Hypotheses

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  6. Symbolic or not-so-symbolic wounds: the behavioral ecology of human scarificationLudvico, Lisa Rose - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1995 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests four hypotheses regarding scarification, which is described as 1) a rite of passage, 2) a hardening/trauma procedure, 3) a nonadaptive sexually selected character, or 4) an adaptive pathogen driven sexually selected character. Only the third hypothesis is supported in a worldwide sample, suggesting that scarification is associated with polygyny. The other three are each supported in different regional subsamples—principally the first hypothesis (supported in Africa, the Insular Pacific, and South America).

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  7. Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples of Murdock's DataRudmin, Floyd Webster - Journal of Socio-Economics, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  8. Living quarter arrangements in polygyny and circumcision and segregation of males at pubertyKitahara, Michio - Ethnology, 1974 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between polygynous living quarter arrangements and the presence or absence of circumcision and segregation of males at puberty. The amount of contact between the father and son is also examined as a factor.

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  9. Pain, fear, and circumcision in boys' adolescent initiation ceremoniesSchlegel, Alice - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 6 Hypotheses

    Schlegel and Barry explore the conditions under which adolescent boys' initiation ceremonies involve rituals that frighten or cause pain to the initiates. The authors look for cross-cultural differences and similarities in cultural features associated with harsh rituals, in particular, genital operations.

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  10. Sex differences in the anatomical locations of human body scarification and tattooing as a function of pathogen prevalenceSingh, Devendra - Evolution and Human Behavior, 1997 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between body scarification and pathogen prevalence. Authors hypothesize that risk of serious pathogens will be related to scarification on areas of the body that are associated with physical attractiveness and fertility. Results show that only female stomach scarification is significantly related to pathogen prevalence.

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