Found 772 Documents across 78 Pages (0.013 seconds)
  1. The role of the father: an anthropological perspectiveKatz, Mary Maxwell - The Role of the Father in Child Development, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the relationship between male parental behavior and influences of species, ecological and social factors. The authors first present a cross-phylogenetic perspective on paternal differences between species, then offer two quantitative studies: a comparative study of non-western human societies that correlates father-infant proximity with socioecological factors and another about father-infant proximity among the !Kung.

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  2. Effects of male power and status on polygyny, extramarital sex, and parental investmentRaj, Vrishica - The Human Voyage: Undergraduate Research in Biological Anthropology, 2018 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present research inquires into the effects, if any, that male status and power have on extramarital sex, parental investment, and polygyny. Using sexual selection theory, the hypothesis is that males in higher positions of power and status are more likely to engage in extramarital sexual activities and be in polygynous relationships was supported. There was no support for an association between male extramarital sex and parental investment.

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  3. Explaining marriage patterns in a globally representative sample through socio-ecology and population history: A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using a new supertreeMinocher, Riana - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2019 - 23 Hypotheses

    Researchers examine marriage patterns of 186 societies from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). The eleven predictor variables are pathogen stress, arranged female marriages, population density, father roles during infancy, temperature, social stratification, wealth inequality, internal warfare, assault frequency, female agricultural contribution, and sex ratio. The two outcome variables measuring polygyny are cultural rules constraining polygyny and the percentage of married men who are polygynous. Controlling on phylogeny using a global supertree of the languages, analysis of marriage patterns reveals that assault frequency and pathogen stress are the strongest predictors of polygyny. These findings offer additional support for the theories of harem-defense polygyny and male genetic quality.

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  4. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  5. Factors in the cross-cultural patterning of male homosexuality: a reappraisal of the literatureCrapo, Richard H. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1995 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study argues that different types of homosexuality must be examined separately. Authors focus on mentorship and pathic homosexual behavior and test factors that are associated with these two types of behavior.

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  6. The cultural consequences of female contribution to subsistenceSchlegel, Alice - American Anthropologist, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study relates female contributions to a variety of social variables. The author divides responses to high female contribution to subsistence into two categories: adaptive (i.e. increased exogamy, polygyny, and bridewealth) and attitudinal (i.e. increased valuation of girls and premarital permissiveness). It is proposed that where women contribute more, “they are perceived less as objects for male sexual and reproductive needs and more as a person in their own right” (149).

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  7. Evolutionary ecology of human pair-bonds: cross-cultural tests of alternative hypothesesQuinlan, Robert J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests three hypotheses on the evolution of the human pair-bond: male-provisioning, male mating competition, and the defense of offspring from other males. Findings indicate that male provisioning and mating competition are factors in the development of the pair-bond. Additional findings indicate that alloparentling, polygyny, and equal contribution to subsistence by each sex contribute to the security of the pair-bond.

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  8. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  9. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  10. Cross-cultural correlates of the ownership of private property: Zelman's gender data revisitedRudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Research, 1996 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article analyzes the predictors of private property ownership with an aim to replicate existing correlations using data from the dissertation of Zelman (1974).

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