Found 828 Documents across 83 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  2. The status of women in preindustrial societiesWhyte, Martin King - , 1978 - 23 Hypotheses

    This book is concerned with explaining variation in the status of women. The author, after measuring over 50 aspects of status, first concludes that status is not a unitary concept. Therefore the author looks at 10 different domains of status. Many traditional explanations are not supported; most support is found for the influence of social complexity which generally lowers female status.

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  3. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

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  4. Ecological determinants of women's status among hunter/gatherersHayden, Brian - Human Evolution, 1986 - 4 Hypotheses

    A materialist approach is used to study the status of women in hunter-gatherer groups. Techno-ecological factors are tested as predictors of women's status.

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  5. A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessnessRosenblatt, Paul C. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  6. Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspectiveLow, Bobbi S. - Journal of Comparative Psychology, 1989 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  7. Female exclusion from religious roles: a cross-cultural test of competing explanationsWelch, Michael R. - Social Forces, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines three theories regarding the lack of participation by women in community religious roles. Empirical analysis suggests that only resource theory has predictive power. Most clearly it suggests that women are more likely to be shamans in societies in which they are highly influential in kin networks but maintain minimal control of property. Neither gynephobia nor the presence of sex-differentiated social spheres appears associated with the prohibition of women’s participation in religious roles.

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  8. Women’s status and mode of production: a cross-cultural testHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 1988 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a materialist approach to the study of women's status. The authors test a Marxist-feminist theory which situates women's status as the end effect in a causal chain that begins with the mode of production and is mediated by the extent to which women control production. Results point to separate, rather than confounding, effects of these two factors on the status of women.

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  9. Female political participation: a cross-cultural explanationRoss, Marc Howard - American Anthropologist, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper explores societal-level mechanisms associated with women’s participation in and exclusion from political life. Analysis suggests there are two statistically independent types of female political participation: involvement in decision-making and the existence of positions controlled by or reserved for women. Multiple regression analysis identifies several social-structural, psychocultural, and behavioral correlates for both types of female political participation and explanatory theory is discussed.

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  10. Spousal interdependence, female power, and divorce: A cross-cultural examinationHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the relationship between women's power/status and divorce. Tests of gender variables with measures of divorce highlights the importance of sexual equality in divorce frequency as well as the effect of division of labor on divorce.

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