Found 688 Documents across 69 Pages (0.031 seconds)
  1. The oedipus complex: cross-cultural evidenceStephens, William N. - , 1962 - 21 Hypotheses

    The author attempts to test the "Oedipus-complex" hypothesis--the psychoanalytic idea that under certain conditions (such as the long-post partum sex taboo) males are sexually attracted to their mothers and as a consequence certain fears and anxiety are generaated. The hypothesis is tested at the societal-level using ethnographic data.

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  2. Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatizationYoung, Frank W. - , 1965 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  3. A cross cultural study of menstrual taboosStephens, William N. - Cross-Cultural Approaches, 1967 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests the relationship between menstrual taboos and castration anxiety. The author posits that the extensiveness of menstrual taboos is determined by the average castration anxiety. Using various measures of castration anxiety, the author finds significant support for this hypothesis.

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  4. Was the Duchess of Windsor right?: A cross-cultural review of the socioecology of ideals of female body shapeAnderson, Judith L. - Ethology and Sociobiology, 1992 - 7 Hypotheses

    Cultures vary widely in regards to beauty standards for female body fat: while industrialized nations typically prefer thinness in women, ethnographic reports indicate that plumpness is valued in many small-scale societies. Here the authors evaluate several hypotheses that relate variation in female body fat preference to variation in socioecology such as food storage, climate, male social dominance, valuation and restriction of women's work, and female stress during adolescence.

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  5. Female physiology and female puberty ritesKitahara, Michio - Ethos, 1984 - 6 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this paper is to examine female puberty rites and to suggest that such rites may be explained in terms of female physiology, as symbolized, for example, by menstruation.

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  6. Totem and taboo, purity and danger…and fads and fashion in the study of pollution rulesCarroll, Michael P. - Behavior Science Research, 1983 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines three theories regarding the existence of pollution rules. Results show support for a psychological theory put forward by Freud that predicts a relationship between father-child contact, post-partum sex taboos, and menstrual taboos.

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  7. Reproduction, ritual, and powerZelman, Elizabeth Crouch - American Ethnologist, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates ritual related to the female reproductive cycle. The author examines two types of ritual female pollution-avoidance ritual. meant to differentiate sex roles in a society, and male ritual (including couvade) associated with the female reproductive cycle, meant to minimize sex differentiation. Empirical analysis reveals several societal characteristics associated with each of these two types of ritual, suggesting that ritual can be used to encourage sex role rigidity or flexibility.

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  8. A cross-cultural study of menstruation, menstrual taboos and related social variablesMontgomery, Rita E. - Ethos, 1974 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article explores biological, psychological, and social explanations for menstrual taboos. Attention is paid to the role of men in rituals associated with reproduction--i.e. before, during and after childbirth, as well as during girls' puberty rites.

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  9. The function of male initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural test of an alternative hypothesisYoung, Frank W. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates theories of male initiation ceremonies. The author examines a hypothesis related to child-rearing variables (sleeping arrangements and post-partum taboo) and rejects it based on empirical analysis. An alternative hypothesis related to male solidarity is offered.

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  10. Body pleasure and the origins of violencePrescott, James W. - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1975 - 4 Hypotheses

    The author hypothesizes that physical violence is strongly related to the deprivation of physical pleasure. The author tests this hypothesis by looking at the relationship between physical affection towards infants, as well as attitudes towards premarital sex, and several variables related to violence. Results support the hypothesis.

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