Found 667 Documents across 67 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Warfare regulation: a cross-cultural test of hypotheses among tribal peoplesTefft, Stanton K. - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 8 Hypotheses

    This paper tests "theories which suggest that there are causal-functional relationships between the dependent variables peacemaking and peace stability on the one hand and certain independent variables, such as political complexity, warrior class, warfare objectives, cultural homology and intersocietal ties, on the other hand." Significant relationships were found between the last three independent variables.

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  2. The evolution of war: a cross-cultural studyOtterbein, Keith F. - , 1970 - 30 Hypotheses

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  3. Societies within peace systems avoid war and build positive intergroup relationshipsFry, Douglas P. - Humanities & Social Sciences Communications, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors explore cultural variables that they propose contribute to the maintenance of peace in non-warring societies. These variables are compared in 16 peaceful systems (as coded by the authors from anthropological and historical data) and in 30 warring societies taken from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). Findings associate more peaceful cultures with peace systems, and non-peaceful cultures with warring societies.

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  4. Risk, uncertainty, and violence in eastern Africa: a regional comparisonEmber, Carol R. - Human Nature, 2012 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines resource problems and warfare in a sample of societies from eastern Africa. The frequency and predictability of resource problems are examined, as are two other dimensions of warfare: resource-taking and commission of atrocities. Differences between state and nonstate societies, as well as pacified and non-pacified societies, are also examined and shown to affect associations between resource and warfare variables.

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  5. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  6. On the emergence of large-scale human social integration and its antecedents in primatesGrueter, Cyril C. - Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 2014 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates whether external warfare, intercommunity trade, and female exogamy lead to more amicable intercommunity relationships. Intercommunity amicability is considered a historical facilitator of the large-scale integration of human groups. The absence of internal warfare is used as a measure for intercommunity amicability.

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  7. Warless societies and the origin of warKelly, Raymond C. - , 2000 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book examines the difference between warless and warlike societies and attempts to determine the point at which a society becomes warlike. The author suggests that differences between warless and warlike societies are mostly organizational and hypothesizes that "unsegmented" societies, or societies that have a weaker sense of group identity and cohesion, will be more likely to be warless than "segmented" societies. Several tests are presented. Results generally support the hypothesis.

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  8. Why there are so few women warriorsAdams, David B. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1983 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the effect of type of warfare and community intermarriage on women's participation in warfare.

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  9. Warless and warlike hunter-gatherers: a comparisonKelly, Robert L. - Warless Societies and the Origin of War, 2000 - 7 Hypotheses

    This book examines the characteristics of warlike and warless foraging societies, as well as the transitional stages that occur when a society becomes warlike. Several predicted correlates of warfare frequency are supported.

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  10. An evaluation of alternative theories of matrilocal versus patrilocal residenceEmber, Carol R. - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the relationship between marital residence and warfare. The author evaluates two theories proposing opposite causalities: one, that internal warfarecauses patrilocality; the other, that residence comes first and influences type of warfare. The author presents a new model emphasizing the role of population size in determining type of warfare, which in turn affects marital residence. However, the role of migration in determining marital residence is also considered.

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