Found 997 Documents across 100 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Network strategy and warPeregrine, Peter N. - Alternative Pathways to Complexity: Households, Markets, World Systems, and Political Economy: Essays Honoring the Legacy of Richard E. Blanton - 3 Hypotheses

    This article draws from previous research by Ember and Ember (1992) that suggests a relationship between socialization for mistrust in others, unpredictable natural disasters, and warfare frequency. Authors hypothesize that the inclusion of a corporate-network strategy variable will improve the predictive power of the Embers' model for warfare. Results support this hypothesis.

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  2. Trade and warfare in cross-cultural perspectiveKorotayev, Andrey V. - Social Evolution & History, 2008 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between warfare and trade and concludes that the relationship varies within different levels of political organization.

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  3. Warfare, atrocities, and political participation: eastern AfricaEmber, Carol R. - Journal of Aggression, Conflict, and Peace Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    The present study attempts to replicate the Ember, Ember, and Russett (1992) worldwide finding that fighting rarely occurs between democracies in a sample of eastern African societies. Following the earlier study, the authors considered internal warfare to be an analog of international warfare and measures of political participation analogous to democracy. The researchers also explore if there is an association between political participation and committing atrocities. Contrary to past findings, internal warfare was not predicted by the same set of variables as the 1992 study, but there is an inverse relationship between committing atrocities and political participation. However, when additional variables were added, internal warfare was significantly predicted by less political participation.

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  4. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  5. Resource Unpredictability, mistrust, and war: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1992 - 6 Hypotheses

    The article tests theories that may explain why warfare frequency varies from society to society. The focus is on ecological problems, particularly different kinds of resource scarcity, but social and psychological theories are also tested with both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Because unpredictable disasters are such a strong predictor in nonstate societies, the authors theorize that war may mostly be caused by a fear of nature.

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  6. A Test of an Evolutionary Hypothesis of Violence Against Women: The Case of Sex RatioStone, Emily A. - Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science, 2017 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study investigates variation in rates of violence against women, primarily interested in two main hypotheses: the Culture of Violence Hypothesis and the Functional Violence Hypothesis. Using the SCCS along with variables from Broude & Greene (1976) and Ember & Ember (1992), the study concluded that warring societies were associated with a greater intolerance of rape, contradicting the Culture of Violence Hypothesis, whereas wife beating, as well as tolerance towards rape, increased with scarcity of women, in line with the evolutionary Functional Violence Hypothesis.

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  7. Resource stress and subsistence diversification across societiesEmber, Carol R. - Nature Sustainability, 2020 - 4 Hypotheses

    Using a cross-cultural sample of 91 societies, this paper draws on ecological theory to test if unpredictable environments will favor subsistence diversification. The general hypothesis is that societies with high climate unpredictability and resource stress would exhibit more subsistence diversity than societies in more stable climates. The authors examined four environmental and resource stress variables while controlling for temperature variance, subsistence activity, and phylogeny. Support was found for 2 of the 4 variables--chronic scarcity and environmental instability. In the discussion they suggest that more commonly observed events (e.g. annual hunger and climate unpredictability) may give people more motivation to change subsistence than rarer events (e.g. natural hazards and famine).

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  8. A global analysis of cultural tightness in non-industrial societiesJackson, Joshua Conrad - Proceedings of the Royal Society, 2020 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds on previous cross-country and cross-state research into Tightness-Looseness (TL) theory, which proposes relationships between the incidence of ecological threat and cultural tightness, as well as tightness’ downstream effects on belief in a moralizing high god, inter-group contact and authoritarian leadership. To evaluate the generalizability of TL theory beyond complex cultures, the authors test these relationships among 86 nonindustrial societies from the ethnographic record. A structural equation model is presented of the results for nonindustrial societies; it is generally in accord with previous findings from more complex societies. Because the nonindustrial sample is more variable, they also look at relationships between societal complexity and kinship heterogeneity, aspects that vary in nonindustrial societies.

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  9. Valuing thinness or fatness in women: reevaluating the effect of resource scarcityEmber, Carol R. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2005 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on preferences for thinness or fatness in women cross-culturally. Results contradict previous studies and the hypothesis that preference for fatness in women is predicted by resource scarcity. Alternative explanations for valuation of fatness are explored, including climate and male dominance.

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  10. War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary modelsEmber, Carol R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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