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  1. Cross-cultural correlates of games of chanceRoberts, John M. - Behavior Science Notes, 1966 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors investigate the cross-cultural correlates of games of chance. They advance a "conflict-enculturation" model to explain why individuals choose to engage in games of chance in particular (as opposed to games of strategy or physical skill). They suggest that games of chance are linked to cultures with antecedent conflict and/or feelings of powerlessness in the presence of uncertainty; both are psychological stressors whose effects may be assuaged by play with uncertainty models in the form of games of chance.

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  2. Sex differences in socialization anxietyWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1979 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  3. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  4. Strategy in games and folk talesRoberts, John M. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1963 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

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  5. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  6. Oaths, autonomic ordeals, and powerRoberts, John M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the presence of oaths and autonomic ordeals in relation to various socioeconomic variables. Several hypotheses are presented, all are supported.

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  7. A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of cultureBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Suppl., 1965 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  8. A cross-cultural study of correlates of crimeBacon, Margaret K. - Journal of Abnormal and social Psychology, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  9. The dependency-conflict hypothesis and the frequency of drunkennessBacon, Margaret K. - Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1974 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study is a reexamination of Bacon's (1965) previous cross-cultural study regarding drinking. The current study supports the dependency-conflict hypothesis that frequency of drunkenness is related to dependency needs in childhood and adulthood.

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  10. Instrumental and expressive socialization: a false dichotomyHendrix, Lewellyn - Sex Roles, 1985 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study reanalyzes the work of Barry, Bacon and Child (1957) on sex differences in child socialization. The authors use factor analysis to determine if the results of the original study are consistent with results yielded using modern methods and computer analysis. Authors find that there is no one general dimension of male-female difference in socialization and that the conclusions of Barry, Bacon, and Child have little meaning.

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