Found 964 Documents across 97 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Evolutionary history of hunter-gatherer marriage practicesWalker, Robert S. - PLoS ONE, 2011 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to reconstruct ancestral marriage practices using hunter-gathers' phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Data suggest that arranged marriages and brideprice/bridewealth likely go back at least to the first modern human migrations out of Africa and that early ancestral human societies probably had low levels of polygyny.

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  2. Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold modelRoss, Cody T. - Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  3. Cross-cultural patterns of marriage and inheritance: a phylogenetic approachCowlishaw, Guy - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1994 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study presents a phylogenetic approach to the work of Hartung (1982) on the relationship between inheritance and marriage patterns. Results indicate that polygyny is associated with male-biased inheritance.

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  4. Explaining monogamy and polygyny among foragers and horticulturalistsHooper, Paul L. - , 2006 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article tests several hypotheses related to the presence or absence of polygyny. Results suggest a negative relationship between polygyny and male provisioning, and positive relationships between polygyny and warfare, interpersonal aggression, and pathogen stress.

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  5. The function of male initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural test of an alternative hypothesisYoung, Frank W. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates theories of male initiation ceremonies. The author examines a hypothesis related to child-rearing variables (sleeping arrangements and post-partum taboo) and rejects it based on empirical analysis. An alternative hypothesis related to male solidarity is offered.

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  6. Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspectiveAyres, Barbara - Anthropological Quarterly, 1974 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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  7. Alternative predictors of polygynyEmber, Melvin - Cross-Cultural Research, 1984 - 4 Hypotheses

    "This paper describes how the "sex-ratio" explanation of polygyny compares with some alternative, supposedly causal explanations. The results suggest that polygyny is best predicted by two statistically independent factors--high male mortality in warfare…and delayed age of marriage for men."

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  8. Wealth concentration associated with frequent violent crime in diverse communitiesBarry III, Herbert - Social Evolution & History, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests the general hypothesis that frequency of violent crimes by individuals is related to high concentrations of wealth.

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  9. Effects of climate on certain cultural practicesWhiting, John W.M. - Explorations in Cultural Anthropology: Essays in Honor of George Peter Murdock, 1964 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study explores ecological reasons that might explain why boys are mostly circumcised in tropical regions, particularly in Africa and the insular Pacific. The author postulates a long causal chain linking: 1) tropical climate to the growing of root and fruit crops; 2) the need to keep babies on mother's milk for as long as possible where the adult diet is lacking in protein; 3) a long post-partum sex taboo as a way to space births; 4) the practice of polygyny (and associated mother-child sleeping) in the face of a long sex taboo; 5) patrilocal residence; and 6) male initiation ceremonies which are believed to result from the combination of mother-child sleeping, the long poast-partum sex taboo and patrilocal residence.

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  10. Effects of male power and status on polygyny, extramarital sex, and parental investmentRaj, Vrishica - The Human Voyage: Undergraduate Research in Biological Anthropology, 2018 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present research inquires into the effects, if any, that male status and power have on extramarital sex, parental investment, and polygyny. Using sexual selection theory, the hypothesis is that males in higher positions of power and status are more likely to engage in extramarital sexual activities and be in polygynous relationships was supported. There was no support for an association between male extramarital sex and parental investment.

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