Found 818 Documents across 82 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. An archaeological correlate of warPeregrine, Peter N. - North American Archaeologist, 1993 - 1 Hypotheses

    Using the ethnographic record, this study develops and tests the idea that community permeability may be used as an archaeological predictor of warfare. With the exception of pastoral societies, community permeability predicts warfare.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Reducing post-disaster conflict: a cross cultural test of four hypotheses using archaeological dataPeregrine, Peter N. - Environmental Hazards, 2018 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article uses pre-defined criteria to sample 22 archaeological climate-related disasters from 9 distinct regions from eHRAF Archaeology. It quantitatively tests four hypotheses regarding change in conflict following climate-related disasters using multiple regression analyses and backwards stepwise regression. Findings demonstrate association between political strategy/authority decision making and degree of post climate disaster conflict.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Social resilience to climate-related disasters in ancient societies: a test of two hypothesesPeregrine, Peter N. - , 2017 - 2 Hypotheses

    In the present study, Peregrine tests two perspectives regarding social resilience to climate-related disasters: 1) that societies with more inclusive and participatory political structures (corporate political strategies) are more resilient to climate-related disasters, and 2) that societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to climate-related disasters. Results support the notion that societies with greater political participation are more socially resilient to catastrophic climate-related disasters. Because these results are justifiably generalizable across multiple historical and cultural contexts, Peregrine's findings are a useful contribution to aid in disaster response policy decision making.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Ethnology versus ethnographic analogy: a common confusion in archaeological interpretationPeregrine, Peter N. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1996 - 0 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the use of analogy to interpret the archaeological record. The author argues that Murdock's method of cross-cultural research is especially valuable for archaeological analogy. Some of the author's previous studies are presented in support of this argument.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Social resilience to nuclear winter: lessons from the Late Antique Little Ice AgePeregrine, Peter N. - Global Security: Health, Science and Policy, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author analyzes conditions that might favor social resilience during the Late Antique Little Ice Age (ca. 536-556 CE). The assumption is made that climatic conditions in the Northern Hemisphere during this period of time are very similar to those that would occur during a nuclear winter. These conditions include a drop in temperature and decreased solar radiation from volcanic eruptions. Measures for social resilience come from multiple variables for social change, which are tested against measures for type of political engagement. It is argued that broad political participation is correlated with resilience.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Some political aspects of craft specializationPeregrine, Peter N. - World Archaeology, 1991 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the reasons behind advances in craft specialization particularly why there is a relationship between advances in craft specialization and the emergence of powerful elites. Hypothesis tests focused on political centralization.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Systemic population control in the Middle and Upper Paleolithic: inferences based on contemporary hunter-gatherersDivale, William Tulio - World Archaeology, 1972 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines cultural forms of population control. Results suggest that female infanticide and warfare are interrelated and effective forms of population control.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Inferences from the shape of dwellingsWhiting, John W.M. - Settlement Archaeology, 1968 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines several correlates of the shape of floor plans of dwellings. Authors find that "whether a culture is settled or nomadic, the form of its family and the presence or absence of status distinctions are related to its house type, and the house types can in turn be inferred from the floor plan." Curvilinear houses are associated with polygyny and nomadism and rectilinear houses are associated with sedentarism, extended families, and status distinctions.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Network strategy and warPeregrine, Peter N. - Alternative Pathways to Complexity: Households, Markets, World Systems, and Political Economy: Essays Honoring the Legacy of Richard E. Blanton - 3 Hypotheses

    This article draws from previous research by Ember and Ember (1992) that suggests a relationship between socialization for mistrust in others, unpredictable natural disasters, and warfare frequency. Authors hypothesize that the inclusion of a corporate-network strategy variable will improve the predictive power of the Embers' model for warfare. Results support this hypothesis.

    Related DocumentsCite