Found 612 Documents across 62 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Language structure is partly determined by social structureLupyan, Gary - PLoS ONE, 2010 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between language structure and social environment, positing that linguistic factors such as morphological complexity are associated with demographic/socio-historical factors such as number of speakers, geographic spread, and degree of language contact. Data support such an association. The authors further propose a Linguistic Niche Hypothesis suggesting that “the level of morphological specialization is a product of languages adapting to the learning constraints and the unique communicative needs of the speaker population” (7).

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  2. Grammars are robustly transmitted even during the emergence of creole languagesBlasi, Damian E. - Nature Human Behavior, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    The authors statistically test existing theories and proposals regarding the existence and nature of the creole language profile. Results indicate that consistencies and variation between creole languages, as with non-creole languages, is a result of genealogical and contact processes. However, creole languages are unique from non-creole languages in that they have more than one language in their ancestry. Findings "call into question the existence of a pidgin stage in creole development and of creole-specific innovations." Support is found for the idea that language learning and transmission are strikingly resilient processes.

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  3. An evolutionary aspect of social structure and a verb "have"Webb, Karen E. - American Anthropologist, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between grammatical forms and a society’s economic activity, particularly whether property-based societies are more likely to develop the possessive verbs. Analysis supports an association.

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  4. The evolution of culture and grammarPerkins, Revere Dale - State University of New York at Buffalo, 1980 - 2 Hypotheses

    This dissertation is a cross-cultural study of the relationship between cultural complexity and linguistic variables. The hypothesis is supported using a sample of fifty languages. Cultural complexity is theorized to instigate change in linguistic devices that are better tailored to express new areas of discourse.

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  5. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  6. Tightness-looseness across the 50 united statesHarrington, Jesse R. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014 - 4 Hypotheses

    Authors contend that many of the differences across the 50 states can be attributed to the degree to which social entities are "tight" (have many strongly enforced rules and little tolerance to deviance) or "loose" (have few strongly enforced rules and greater tolerance for deviance). Significant correlations were found between many state characteristics and tightness-looseness.

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  7. Law and violence: a cross-cultural studyMasumura, Wilfred T. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how superordinate justice (whereby officials can arbitrate disputes involving homicide) and superordinate punishment (whereby officials can punish perpetrators of homicide) affect the level of internal violence in preindustrial societies. Results suggest that these two types of superordinate power do deter violent fatalities but that overall, “in order to increase violence substantively, arbitration authority over killings must be backed up by the power to penalize” (395).

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  8. Social structure, socialization values, and disciplinary techniques: a cross-cultural analysisPetersen, Larry R. - Journal of Marriage and Family, 1982 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the relationship between the use of physical punishment during child socialization and the amount of supervision that adults experience. The authors analyze data using a path analysis which suggests that the greater the valuation of conformity relative to self-reliance, the greater the use of physical punishment during child socialization. Precursors of conformity are also suggested.

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  9. Socialization values and parental control techniques: A cross-cultural analysis of child-rearingEllis, Godfrey J. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1992 - 3 Hypotheses

    An existing body of research has, based on Kohn's (1977) theory of values of conformity vs. self-reliance in children of blue -collar vs. white-collar working families, suggested that socialization which emphasizes conformity is more likely to employ coercive rather than inductive methods. However, the researchers' tests for correlation of emphasis on conformity with coercive, inductive, and overall parental control indicate that parents in societies which emphasize conformity utilize both methods equally, and exert more control overall over their children than those in societies which emphasize self-reliance. The authors also test for predictors of conformity and present path models of direct and indirect effects.

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  10. Art styles, social stratification, and cognition: an analysis of greek vase paintingDressler, William W. - American Ethnologist, 1975 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests Fischer's (1961) cross-cultural hypotheses about the association between social structure and styles of art using formal design elements on painted vases in ancient Greece. Results show support for all of Fischer's hypotheses.

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