Found 861 Documents across 87 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Population, warfare, and the male supremacist complexDivale, William Tulio - American Anthropologist, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the factors associated with the development and persistence of an ideology of male supremacy. Authors identify several realms of culture that show a clear male preference and suggest that warfare is the most significant cause of the male supremacy complex in preindustrial societies. Authors hypothesize that warfare will be positively related to female infanticide. Results support this hypothesis. Another hypothesis relating diet to warfare and infanticide is provided, but not tested.

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  2. Cargo cults and relational separationKnauft, Bruce M. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author hypothesizes that the level of disruption caused by a cargo cult varies directly with the degree to which indigenous people become separated from the agents of Western culture directly prior to the cult outbreak. Results support this hypothesis.

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  3. The material culture and social institutions of the simpler peoples: an essay in correlationHobhouse, L. T. - , 1915 - 16 Hypotheses

    An early cross-cultural study that sought to establish correlations between "stages" of economic culture and a variety of different social and political institutions, such as form of government and justice, marriage and kinship, and behaviors during warfare.

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  4. Political organization and political participation: exit, voice, and loyalty in preindustrial societiesRoss, Marc Howard - Comparative Politics, 1988 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines causes of political participation in pre-industrial societies, particularly the level of resources and organization of resources. Hirschman’s concepts of exit, voice, and loyalty are also discussed. A distinction is made between range of community decision-making and the degree of adult involvement. Results from a multiple regression analysis favor the more structural variables (i.e. organization of resources) in the prediction of political participation.

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  5. The modern impact of precolonial centralization in AfricaGennaioli, Nicola - Journal of Economic Growth, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors empirically assess the relationship between precolonial centralization and the implementation of modernization programs by African governments. Their findings indicate that current African countries tend to have better provisioning of public goods (including better access to education, healthcare, and infrastructure) when their ethnic groups' precolonial institutions were more centralized.

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  6. A cross-cultural method for predicting nonmaterial traits in archeologyMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - Behavior Science Notes, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    "This paper presents an exploratory attempt to solve the problem of how to infer traits for which no direct material evidence remains." The author suggests that the archeologically defined community pattern can predict several sociocultural traits. Results support this hypothesis.

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  7. Mother-infant separation and physical growthGunders, Shulamith - Ethnology, 1968 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between adult male height and mother-infant separation. Results indicate that males who are separated from their mothers briefly during infancy are taller in adulthood than those who are not.

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  8. The origins of the economy: a comparative study of distribution in primitive and peasant economiesPryor, Frederic L. - , 1977 - 39 Hypotheses

    Considerable disagreement exists in regard to the origin and distribution of economic phenomena such as money, slavery, markets, exchange, and imbalanced transfers. Here the author utilizes a worldwide cross-cultural sample of 60 pre-industrial "societies" to empirically test many economic hypotheses, with a focus on distributional mechanisms and institutions.

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  9. Explaining alcoholism: an empirical test and reformationWhitehead, Paul C. - Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1974 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines a hypothesis that associates alcoholism with the structure and quality of social norms related to drinking. Analysis yields little support for this hypothesis, but the amount of alcohol consumed by members of the society emerges as an important predictive variable. A new theory of alcoholism that takes this variable into account is discussed.

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  10. The friedman-savage utility function in cross-cultural perspectivePryor, Frederic L. - Journal of Political Economy, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the presence of gambling in preindustrial societies. Analysis shows that the presence of gambling can be predicted by region, the presence of domestic commercial money, socioeconomic inequality, and mobility combined with food supply from animal husbandry. The author suggests that the ideas underlying the Friedman-Savage utility function (1984) can be helpful in making predictions about which precapitalist societies do and which do not engage in gambling.

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