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  1. Murder and suicide in forty non-literate societiesPalmer, Stuart - Journal of Criminal Law, Criminology and Police Science, 1965 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper tests assumptions regarding the inverse relationship between murder and suicide. Analysis suggests that murder and suicide in fact vary together, and they are also positively associated with overall punishment in a society.

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  2. Suicide, homicide, and the effects of socializationLester, David - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for an association between displays of aggression and socialization techniques in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests there is no relationship between discipline techniques and homicidal or suicidal behavior.

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  3. The relation between discipline experiences and the expression of aggressionLester, David - American Anthropologist, 1967 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates the relationship between discipline experiences in preindustrial societies and aggressive behavior at the societal level. No associations are found between discipline experiences and suicide, murder, aggression resulting from alcohol consumption, or aggression expressed in war-making.

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  4. Social contexts of suicideKrauss, Herbert H. - Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the thwarting disorientation theory of suicide, suggesting that the rate of suicide in a society can be predicted from thwarting disorientation traits such as men’s divorce freedom and defiant homicide.

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  5. Lethal aggression in mobile forager bands and implications for the origins of warFry, Douglas P. - Science, 2013 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the incidence of warfare in mobile forager band societies. Data analysis suggests that the majority of lethal aggression in such societies can be classified as homicide. Feuding is common and warfare a definite minority. The authors offer several reasons why warfare would be uncommon in such societies: residence, descent, subsistence strategy, and social order are all cited.

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  6. Population density in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - American Ethnologist, 1979 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how population density affects social behavior, particularly whether it is a cause of stress in humans that manifests in pathological behavior or mistreatment of children. Analysis indicates that population density is not a cause of these behaviors, and with some variables (such as with divorce and sexual anxiety), there is a negative association with population density.

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  7. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  8. Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggression, and witchcraftQuinlan, Robert J. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  9. General evolution and Durkheim's hypothesis of crime frequency: A cross-cultural testLeavitt, Gregory C. - The Sociological Quarterly, 1992 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper is an investigation into the relationship between social differentiation as a proxy for societal 'development' and various categories of crime. A positive relationship is interpreted by the author as empirical cross-cultural support for Durkheim's theory that these two factors will increase together as parallel processes of 'sociocultural evolution'.

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  10. Law and violence: a cross-cultural studyMasumura, Wilfred T. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how superordinate justice (whereby officials can arbitrate disputes involving homicide) and superordinate punishment (whereby officials can punish perpetrators of homicide) affect the level of internal violence in preindustrial societies. Results suggest that these two types of superordinate power do deter violent fatalities but that overall, “in order to increase violence substantively, arbitration authority over killings must be backed up by the power to penalize” (395).

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