Found 598 Documents across 60 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Body pleasure and the origins of violencePrescott, James W. - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1975 - 4 Hypotheses

    The author hypothesizes that physical violence is strongly related to the deprivation of physical pleasure. The author tests this hypothesis by looking at the relationship between physical affection towards infants, as well as attitudes towards premarital sex, and several variables related to violence. Results support the hypothesis.

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  2. Killing of captured enemies: a cross-cultural studyOtterbein, Keith F. - Current Anthropology, 2000 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between political system and practices of killing captured enemies. Concludes that political systems (some simpler and some more complex) relying on terror tend to kill all enemies.

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  3. Co-occurrence of ostensive communication and generalizable knowledge in forager storytelling: cross-cultural evidence of teaching in forager societiesSugiyama, Michelle S. - Human Nature, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examined the presence of ostensive-communicative behaviors in educational storytelling within foraging cultures. Ostensive communication includes prosody and gestures used to direct attention to something or someone. The author analyzed 14 behaviors of ostensive communication and tested whether they co-occur with the transmission of knowledge in storytelling. All 53 forager cultures examined demonstrated the use of 2 or more of those communicative behaviors in oral storytelling. This supports the author’s claim of ostensive-communicative behavior as a universal pedagogical tool in forager cultures.

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  4. A glorious warrior in war: Cross-cultural evidence of honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflictNawata, Kengo - Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 2019 - 4 Hypotheses

    Research sampled 143 societies from the Standard Cross Cultural Sample to test the relationship between honor culture, social rewards for warriors, and intergroup conflicts. Using mediation analysis based on multiple regression, and structural equation modeling, the research supported the theory that honor culture was positively associated with intergroup conflict, and that this relationship was mediated by social rewards for warriors.

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  5. 'Beauty magic': Deceptive sexual signalling and the evolution of ritualPower, Camilla - The evolution of culture: An interdisciplinary view, 1999 - 2 Hypotheses

    The author attempts to evaluate a model adaptive ritual in a sample of sub-Saharan African groups in which ritual cosmetic decoration acts as a costly signal of coalition membership and sexual fitness. The prediction is that, according to sexual selection theory, male ritual signalling will be more extreme in societies with more inter-male competition, while severity of female ritual signalling will be associated with greater need to establish costs that protect against the danger of free riders. The prediction is supported by two tests which proxy inter-male competition by degree of polygny, and threat of free riders by population density.

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  6. Warfare, sex ratio and polygynyEmber, Melvin - Ethnology, 1974 - 6 Hypotheses

    This paper suggests that polygyny may be best explained by uneven sex ratios, particularly an excess of women while men are engaged in warfare. The author also considers Whiting’s 1964 theory that used post-partum sex taboos to explain polygyny. These two theories are tested cross-culturally and results suggest that polygyny is a response to an unbalanced sex ratio in favor of women.

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  7. Farming and Fighting: An Empirical Analysis of the Ecological-Evolutionary Theory of the Incidence of WarfareEff, E. Anthon - Structure and Dynamics, 2012 - 13 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors seek to reevaluate Nolan's (2003) study on the primary determinants of war. They reanalyze his hypotheses with what they claim are more robust measures and methodology. They conclude that there is only a little evidence supporting Nolan's theories, that more productive technology and higher population density predict war, and that overall ecological-evolutionary and sociopolitical explanations of war are equally supported by empirical data.

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  8. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  9. The role of rewards in motivating participation in simple warfareGlowacki, Luke - Human Nature, 2013 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines reasons for participation in warfare and tests a hypothesis concerning cultural rewards from war. Data supports this hypothesis. The authors also critique alternative theories of participation in warfare that draw on group selection and the risk of punishment.

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  10. Disappearance of the incest taboo: a cross-cultural test of general evolutionary hypothesesLeavitt, Gregory C. - American Anthropologist, 1989 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents a theory of evolutionary development of incest regulation, namely that as societal complexity increases the incest taboo will become less extensive. The author presents empirical support for this theory, though the association is not supported among simply structured societies. The role of descent type is also discussed.

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