Found 161 Documents across 17 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Effects of infant-carrying practices on rhythm in musicAyres, Barbara - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper hypothesizes that cross-cultural variation in rhythm is related to variation in infant carrying practices. Suggestions are made regarding the psychological origin of rhythm as well as the function and importance of music in human experience.

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  2. A comparative study of human sacrificeSheils, Howard Dean - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study takes an economic approach in examining the practice of human sacrifice as it relates to notions of the economic value of human life. Codes are included.

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  3. Female aggression in cross-cultural perspectiveBurbank, Victoria K. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1987 - 1 Hypotheses

    Female aggression, reasons and targets of that aggression are described using a cross-cultural sample. It is suggested that female aggression is often a means of competing for men or subsistence products, but it also may be a means of defense.

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  4. A cross-cultural study of correlates of crimeBacon, Margaret K. - Journal of Abnormal and social Psychology, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  5. A cross-cultural study of aggression and crimeAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 18 Hypotheses

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  6. Sexual dimorphisms and breeding systems in pinnipeds, ungulates, primates, and humansAlexander, Richard D. - Evolutionary Biology and Human Social Behavior: An Anthropological Perspective, 1979 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between sexual dimorphism and degree of polygyny. Authors test this relationship in both humans and non-human species. In non-human species, every correlation between sexual dimorphism (measured by body length) and degree of polygyny was significant. In human populations, sexual dimporhism was not related to degree of polygyny, however, there were some differences between populations with socially imposed monogomy and those with ecologically imposed monogamy.

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  7. Correlates of political complexityAbrahamson, Mark - American Sociological Review, 1969 - 3 Hypotheses

    It is suggested that the degree of political complexity is more strongly related to degree of social differentiation than to size and concentration of population.

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  8. A cross-cultural note on durkheim's theory of suicideRootman, Irving - Life-Threatening Behavior, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    Rootman tests a formulation of Durkheim's (1897) theory of suicide. Independent variables include the amount a society, group, or social condition is integrated or regulated.

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  9. Privacy, love and in-law avoidanceCozby, Paul C. - American Psychological Association. 79th Annual Convention, Proceedings., 1971 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors explore the relationship between privacy among newlywed couples and romantic love as a basis for marriage. Authors also consider the relationship between newlywed privacy and kin avoidence. Both associations are found to be statistically significant.

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  10. A comparative study of deviations from sexual moresBrown, Julia - American Sociological Review, 1952 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article investigates which sexual behaviors are tabued (tabooed) and the frequency and severity of their punishments. Results indicate that incest, abduction, and rape are more frequently tabued, and that frequent tabuing is associated with more severe punishment. Human and supernatural agency in punishment is also examined.

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