Found 168 Documents across 17 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Scale analysis, evolutionary sequences, and the rating of culturesCarneiro, Robert L. - A Handbook of Method in Cultural Anthropology, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    Carneiro presents work on the evolutionary sequences of cultures. He concludes that human societies have evolved in a direction towards increased complexity. He also discovers a specific sequence of cultural traits that societies have largely followed.

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  2. Ascertaining, testing, and interpreting sequences of cultural developmentCarneiro, Robert L. - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1968 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study takes an evolutionary approach to understanding cultural development. The author suggests that "the degree of regularity in the relative order of development of any two traits is directly proportional to the evolutionary distance between them." Scale analysis supports this proposition.

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  3. On the relationship between size of population and complexity of social organizationCarneiro, Robert L. - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the association between population size and social organization. Empirical analysis suggests that larger societies tend to develop more elaborate organization if they are to remain unified and integrated.

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  4. Sociobiology: Another viewMunroe, Robert L. - Reviews in Anthropology, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article suggests that Wilson's definition of sociobiology, which incorporates underlying principles of animal social behavior, can be applied to human bahvior. Specifically, Wilson's assertion that the major ecological conditions associated with monogamy in animal societies, is tested on human societies.

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  5. Institutionalized male transvestism and sex distinctionsMunroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study attempts to replicate earlier findings regarding transvestism using a larger sample and a different index of sex distinctions. It is asserted that societies that maximize sex distinctions will not have institutionalized male transvestism.

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  6. Response to ember and ember's "climate, econiche, and sexuality: influences on sonority in language"Munroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    Munroe and Fought attempt to add new perspective to Ember and Ember's (2007) assertion that certain environmental features help to predict mean sonority levels in speech. This article discusses the other possible elements such as word length that might raise the level of communicative efficiency.

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  7. The couvade: a psychological analysisMunroe, Robert L. - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines possible correlates of the couvade. Results suggest that matri-residence, mother-infant sleeping arrangements, and low male salience all are associated with the couvade.

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  8. Cross-cultural correlates of the consonant-vowel (cv) syllableMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1996 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines whether language construction, specifically the number of consonant-vowel syllables, will be related to the environment and literacy of a society. Empirical analysis suggests that consonant-vowel syllables are more common in warmer climates and less common in written languages.

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  9. Warm climates and sonority classes: not simply more vowels and fewer consonantsMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2009 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article adds nuanced findings to the previous generalization that high sonority of the vowel explains its more frequent use in warmer climates. The authors find that “speakers in warm-climate languages make more use of the so-called “sonorant” consonants, that is, consonants with some of the qualities of vowels” (123).

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  10. Climate and the consonant-vowel (CV) syllable: a replication within language familiesMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using a sample of four language families, this paper replicates previous findings on the relationship between consonant-vowel syllable use and climate. An secondary finding on the relationship between consonant-vowel syllable use and writing system was also replicated.

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