Found 79 Documents across 8 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Polygyny, economy and the role of womenGoody, Jack - The Character of Kinship, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the relationship between plural marriage and women's position in the economy. Comparisons are made between this relationship in various locations and cultures. The article concludes that female farming is not sufficient as an explanation.

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  2. Adoption in cross-cultural perspectiveGoody, Jack - Comparative Studies in Society and History, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The goal of this paper is to inquire into the reasons behind the uneven distribution of adoption by linking it with the other broad differences between the major Eurasian and African societies.

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  3. Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a commentGoody, Jack - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  4. Cousin termsGoody, Jack - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

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  5. Sideways or downwards? Lateral and vertical succession, inheritance and descent in africa and eurasiaGoody, Jack - Man, n.s., 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines direction of succession and inheritance as they relate to culture area and kinship system. Several hypotheses are presented and all are supported.

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  6. Causal inferences concerning inheritance and propertyGoody, Jack - Human Relations, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper examines diverging devolution—the transmission of property to both males and females—and its predictors and consequences. Particular attention is paid to kinship terminology and control of women’s marriage. Multiple hypotheses are supported.

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  7. Bridewealth and dowry in Africa and EurasiaGoody, Jack - Bridewealth and Dowry, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter considers several forms of wealth transmission at marriage. The relationships between descent rules and incidence of bridewealth, dowry, and gift exchange are examined and several patterns emerge from empirical analysis.

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  8. Ethnic violence in Africa: destructive legacies of pre-colonial statesPaine, Jack - International Organization, 2019 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigated the difference in rates of violence of precolonial states and stateless ethnic groups in postcolonial Africa. The author hypothesized ethnic groups of precolonial states (PCS) would experience more violence, (i.e. coup attempts and civil wars) than non-PCS groups. The author suggested that because of PCS countries’ inability to allow rival ethnic groups into power positions in addition to the extra power PCS groups gained under colonial rule may lead to more violence.

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  9. Resource stress and subsistence diversification across societiesEmber, Carol R. - Nature Sustainability, 2020 - 4 Hypotheses

    Using a cross-cultural sample of 91 societies, this paper draws on ecological theory to test if unpredictable environments will favor subsistence diversification. The general hypothesis is that societies with high climate unpredictability and resource stress would exhibit more subsistence diversity than societies in more stable climates. The authors examined four environmental and resource stress variables while controlling for temperature variance, subsistence activity, and phylogeny. Support was found for 2 of the 4 variables--chronic scarcity and environmental instability. In the discussion they suggest that more commonly observed events (e.g. annual hunger and climate unpredictability) may give people more motivation to change subsistence than rarer events (e.g. natural hazards and famine).

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  10. Residential variation among hunter-gatherersEmber, Carol R. - Behavior Science Research, 1975 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study explores predictors of variation in two dimensions of marital residence patterns among hunter-gatherers: 1) the tendency toward patrilocality versus matrilocality and 2) the tendency toward unilocality versus bilocality.

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