Found 90 Documents across 9 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Ecology, trade, and states in pre-colonial AfricaFenske, James - Journal of the European Economic Association, 2014 - 3 Hypotheses

    The author analyzes 440 Sub-Saharan African societies to test whether trade across ecologically diverse zones is predictive of degree of state centralization (state capacity or strength of state) in pre-colonial Africa. The author finds that diverse ecology is predictive of state capacity and that trade supports class stratification. The author also emphasizes the importance of historical contingency and ethnographic data consultation in understanding mechanisms in individual cases.

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  2. Private lands and common oceans: analysis of the development of property regimesAcheson, James M. - Current Anthropology, 2015 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this article, the author departs from previous research on common vs. private property ownership predictors to understand why ocean property rights often play out differently than land. As opposed to the dominant hypothesis that common property regimes will change to private property when resources are scarce and population increases, the author proposes economic defendability (the relationship between the value of the property and the cost to defend it) as a better predictor of property regime type.

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  3. A comparison of three measures of social complexitySchaefer, James Michael - American Anthropologist, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author compares three scales of social complexity (Naroll's Social Development Index, Freeman's Scale, and Marsh's Index of Differentiation) and determine whether they tend to measure the same developmental variable. The author's statistical comparisons illustrate that each scale applies the same standard in ranking societies

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  4. Food taboos and level of culture: a cross-cultural studyLeary, James R. - Final Report, USPHS Grant No. A-3557, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study looks at the relationship between cultural complexity and food taboos. Results indicate that less complex societies tend to have more restrictions on eating than more complex societies.

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  5. A hologeistic study of family structure and sentiment, supernatural beliefs, and drunkennessSchaefer, James Michael - , 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study tests a broad hypothesis that alcohol is employed to relieve anxiety and feelings of powerlessness. Frequency of drunkenness and drunken brawling were associated with several variables, including supernatural beliefs, political systems, settlement patterns, and division of labor.

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  6. Trance states: a theoretical model and cross-cultural analysisWinkelman, Michael James - Ethos, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article offers a detailed analysis of neurophysiological processes involved in altered states of consciousness. Cross-cultural hypotheses concerning altered states of consciousness are tested.

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  7. Societal complexity or production techniques: another look at udy's data on the structure of work organizationsNorr, James L. - American Journal of Sociology, 1977 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study asserts that the structure of work organizations is affected more by production techniques than societal complexity. Empirical analysis suggests two trends: 1) production techniques that increase the importance of workers will influence rationality in work organizations, and 2) production techniques that increase the importance of workers and societal complexity will affect the bureaucratic elements of work organizations approximately equally. These findings challenge Udy’s (1970) thesis that complex peasant societies face more challenges than less complex societies in transitioning to modern industrial work forms.

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  8. Aztec human sacrifice: cross-cultural assessments of the ecological hypothesisWinkelman, Michael James - Ethnology, 1998 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article explores ecological, religious, and social correlates of human sacrifice and cannibalism in a cross-cultural sample. Support is found for associations between human sacrifice and population density, population pressure, war for land and resources, and a low hierarchical focus of religion. Human sacrifice among Aztecs is given particular attention.

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  9. Shamans and other "magico-religious" healers: a cross-cultural study of their origins, nature, and social transformationsWinkelman, Michael James - Ethos, 1990 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article examines shamans and other types of magico-religious healers. Agriculture and political integration are suggested to influence the transformation of shamans into shaman/healers, healers, or possession-trance mediums.

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  10. Drunkenness and culture stress: a holocultural testSchaefer, James Michael - Transcultural Psychiatry, 1974 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests cross-cultural hypotheses that predict the variables that lead to drunkenness. Previous hypotheses are reviewed and retested and control tests attempt to ascertain the adequacy of the cross-cultural method.

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