Found 83 Documents across 9 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatizationYoung, Frank W. - , 1965 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  2. Menstrual taboos and social rigidityYoung, Frank W. - Cross-Cultural Approaches, 1967 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study first reviews two explanations of menstrual taboos: taboos as an aspect of social rigidity and a psychogenic interpretation of menstrual taboos. The authors chiefly advocate a sociogenic explanation of menstrual taboos.

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  3. More 'altruistic' punishment in larger societiesMarlowe, Frank W. - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2008 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between population size (and complexity) and the level of third-party punishment in economic games. Results demonstrate that people in larger, more complex societies engage in significantly more third-party punishment than people in small-scale societies.

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  4. Marital residence among foragersMarlowe, Frank W. - Current Anthropology, 2004 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article challenges an earlier finding that hunter-gatherers are predominantly virilocal in residence. The author presents new tests of marital residence including early patterns in marital residence; results suggest that foragers are more multilocal than nonforagers. The author theorizes that bride service, food acquisition methods, small population size, little accumulated wealth, and low frequency of warfare among foragers could all influence the tendency toward multilocal residence.

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  5. The mating system of foragers in the standard cross-cultural sampleMarlowe, Frank W. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines variation in polygyny among foragers. Empirical analysis suggests that the level of male provisioning influences mating systems: higher male contribution to subsistence is associated with monogamy. The influences of pathogen stress, male-male competition, and male coercion are also considered.

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  6. Hunting and gathering: the human sexual division of foraging laborMarlowe, Frank W. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article explores the sexual division of labor among foragers, focusing on resource availability and constraints on women’s foraging activities. The authors conclude that “there is a greater division of foraging labor in more seasonal habitats where less gathering is possible and more extractive, tool-based foraging is required” (191).

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  7. Cultural dimensions reconsidered: global and regional analyses of the ethnographic atlasSmith, Frank J. - American Anthropologist, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the patterns in associations between cultural traits. Factor analysis and hierarchical cluster analyses were employed to identify various dimensions of culture. Regional patterns and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

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  8. Patterns of cultural diffusion: analyses of trait associations across societies by content and geographical proximitySmith, Frank J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1977 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article suggests that societies are not passive receivers of traits, but rather that diffusion is purposive, sensitive to its environmental outcomes and thus influenced by trait content. Findings support this hypothesis.

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  9. Food habits in non-industrial societiesMoore, Frank W. - Dimensions of Nutrition, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study reviews the dietary habits of South and East Asia, Oceania, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. Ethnographic descriptions and raw data are presented. The author concludes with several observed patterns: humans are carnivorous and become vegetarian by force of circumstance; taboos are more commonly used on meat than on plants; eating patterns conform to economic base; people tend to extract a fairly high percentage of available resources from their environment.

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  10. Hunter-gatherers and human evolutionMarlowe, Frank W. - Evolutionary Anthropology, 2005 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationships between habitat and social organization among humans and other species. Diet, technology, group size, home range, mobility, kinship, marital residence, sexual division of labor, mating system, central places, food sharing, and egalitarianism are all considered.

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