Found 91 Documents across 10 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Political organization and political participation: exit, voice, and loyalty in preindustrial societiesRoss, Marc Howard - Comparative Politics, 1988 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines causes of political participation in pre-industrial societies, particularly the level of resources and organization of resources. Hirschman’s concepts of exit, voice, and loyalty are also discussed. A distinction is made between range of community decision-making and the degree of adult involvement. Results from a multiple regression analysis favor the more structural variables (i.e. organization of resources) in the prediction of political participation.

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  2. Socioeconomic complexity, socialization, and political differentiation: a cross-cultural studyRoss, Marc Howard - Ethos, 1981 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines structural and dispositional explanations for complexity of political institutions. Analysis suggests that both socioeconomic organization and socialization variables are useful in understanding the concentration, specialization, and centralization of political power, but socioeconomic organization variables have stronger associations.

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  3. Female political participation: a cross-cultural explanationRoss, Marc Howard - American Anthropologist, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper explores societal-level mechanisms associated with women’s participation in and exclusion from political life. Analysis suggests there are two statistically independent types of female political participation: involvement in decision-making and the existence of positions controlled by or reserved for women. Multiple regression analysis identifies several social-structural, psychocultural, and behavioral correlates for both types of female political participation and explanatory theory is discussed.

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  4. A cross-cultural theory of political conflict and violenceRoss, Marc Howard - Political Psychology, 1986 - 0 Hypotheses

    This study tests various theories on conflict. Multiple regression analyses are presented and support is given for the psychocultural perspective.

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  5. Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a new analysisRoss, Marc Howard - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1985 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  6. The psychophysiological component of cultural difference in color naming and illusion susceptibilityBornstein, Marc H. - Behavior Science Notes, 1973 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines the variation in color naming and susceptibility to visual illusions cross-culturally. Results suggest a geographic patterning of color naming and illusion susceptibility which parallels the distribution of eye pigmentation.

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  7. Legal evolution: one further stepWimberly, Howard - American Journal of Sociology, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    "In an earlier study of the evolution of elements of legal organization, a Guttman scale was developed having as scale steps (elements of legal organization) counsel, police, and mediation. In this study, one further step, that of courts, is discussed, and a new Guttman scale for legal evolution presented."

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  8. A comparative study of human sacrificeSheils, Howard Dean - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study takes an economic approach in examining the practice of human sacrifice as it relates to notions of the economic value of human life. Codes are included.

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  9. Monogamy and independent familiesSheils, Howard Dean - Behavior Science Notes, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article suggests that the relationship of monogamy and independent families to societal complexity is best represented by a curvilinear rather than a linear model. Though the variance explained in this relationship is low, it is somewhat increased when variables are scored as dummy variables rather than ordinal.

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  10. The importance of agriculture from the perspective of neoevolutionary theorySheils, Howard Dean - Rural Sociology, 1972 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article posits a theory of social evolution based on agriculture. The author suggests that a society’s energy source, type of tool materials, and systems of agriculture constitute a variable cluster, and that they are associated with societal scale, economic differentiation, and mode of political integration. Empirical analysis supports this neoevolutionary theory of agriculture.

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