Found 1693 Hypotheses across 170 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "Both for real property and movable property there is a very significant association of patrilineal systems with vertical transmission and matrilineal ones with lateral transmission" (634)Goody, Jack - Sideways or downwards? Lateral and vertical succession, inheritance and des..., 1970 - 2 Variables

    This article examines direction of succession and inheritance as they relate to culture area and kinship system. Several hypotheses are presented and all are supported.

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  2. The Eurasian tradition of adoption is not widely found in Africa due to the way in which property is transmitted from one generation to the next by vertical inheritance (76)Goody, Jack - Adoption in cross-cultural perspective, 1969 - 1 Variables

    The goal of this paper is to inquire into the reasons behind the uneven distribution of adoption by linking it with the other broad differences between the major Eurasian and African societies.

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  3. "There is a distinct association of Eskimo terms with bilateral [descent] systems . . . and with diverging devolution . . . the transmission of property to offspring of both sexes" (129)Goody, Jack - Cousin terms, 1970 - 3 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

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  4. The role of women in agriculture is positively correlated with the rate of polygyny (183)Goody, Jack - Polygyny, economy and the role of women, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article discusses the relationship between plural marriage and women's position in the economy. Comparisons are made between this relationship in various locations and cultures. The article concludes that female farming is not sufficient as an explanation.

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  5. The following variables are dependent upon diverging devolution (transmission of property to both males and females): greater control of womens' marriage (prohibition of premarital sex, endogamy, father's brother's daughter marriage, monogamy, alternative residence) and by extension Eskimo kinship terminology which isolates the sibling group form "cousins" (296)Goody, Jack - Causal inferences concerning inheritance and property, 1970 - 6 Variables

    This paper examines diverging devolution—the transmission of property to both males and females—and its predictors and consequences. Particular attention is paid to kinship terminology and control of women’s marriage. Multiple hypotheses are supported.

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  6. The proportion of uterine systems of inheritance (matrilineal) is greater in Africa than in Eurasia or other continents. But agnatic (patrilineal) inheritance is predominant worldwide (630)Goody, Jack - Sideways or downwards? Lateral and vertical succession, inheritance and des..., 1970 - 2 Variables

    This article examines direction of succession and inheritance as they relate to culture area and kinship system. Several hypotheses are presented and all are supported.

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  7. Lack of agriculture will be negatively associated with female inheritance of property, while intensive agriculture will be positively associated with female inheritance (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  8. Dependence on agriculture for subsistence will be associated with terrestrial resource stress. (81)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 3 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  9. Dependence on agriculture for subsistence will be positively associated with sedentism. (87)Frederic L. Pryor - Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial Societies, 2005 - 2 Variables

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  10. Social stratification and political complexity (representing hierarchy) will be consistent with a model that has landesque capital intensive agriculture as the dependent variable.Sheehan, Oliver - Coevolution of landesque capital intensive agriculture and sociopolitical hi..., 2018 - 3 Variables

    Using phylogenetic methods, this research examines the relationship between landesque capital intensive agriculture ("permanent changes to landscape, such as construction of terraces and irrigation canals"(3631)) , political complexity, and social stratification amongst 155 Austronesian-speaking societies. Researchers attempted to find an underlying causality between the above mentioned variables, which have already been shown to be cross-culturally related. Results of statistical testing are most consistent with their being no clear causal link between the tested variables. The researchers claim this demonstrates social complexity and the multifaceted nature of cultural evolution.

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