Found 3642 Hypotheses across 365 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. There will be a positive association between sororate and normal bifurcate merging terminology or step-bifurcate collateral terminology for aunts and siblingschildren (woman speaking) (349-50).Pans, A.E.M.J. - Levirate and sororate and the terminological classification of uncles, aunts..., 1989 - 2 Variables

    This study re-examines the hypothesis of Sapir (1916) regarding the relationship between levirate and sororate and kinship terminology. The author critiques Murdock’s (1947) work on this topic and performs his own analysis for four hypotheses. Results suggest that “the levirate and sororate are significantly correlated to the occurrence of bifurcate merging terminology and step-bifurcate collateral terminology” (352). Exceptions to this finding are also discussed.

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  2. ". . . rules of preferential mating, especially the levirate and sororate, may produce . . . [bifurcate merging]" (60)Murdock, George Peter - Bifurcate merging: a test of five theories, 1947 - 2 Variables

    This study examines previous hypotheses concerning kinship terminologies, particularly the development of bifurcate merging. The roles of moieties, exogamy, unilinear kin groupings, unilinear descent, and preferential mating are considered.

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  3. There is a co-evolutionary relationship between bifurcate-merging terminology and cross-cousin marriage.Passmore, Sam - Kinbank: A global database of kinship terminology, 2023 - 2 Variables

    Kinbank is a global database of 210,903 kinship terms derived from 1,229 spoken and signed languages. The authors created Kinbank as a tool to help explain recurring patterns across cultures through kinship terminology. They illustrate its usefulness by addressing two questions as an example: 1) Is there gender bias in the phonological structure of parent terms? and 2) Did bifurcate-merging terminology and cross-cousin marriage co-evolve in Bantu languages? Using a Bayesian phylogenetic approach, the authors find support for the first question, but none for the latter.

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  4. "By comparison with bifurcate collateral terminology, bifurcate collateral terminology, bifurcate merging terminology tends to be associated with matriliny. . . . By comparison with derivative bifurcate merging terminology, it is also associated with matriliny . . ." (712)Aberle, David F. - Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspective, 1961 - 2 Variables

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  5. "Reasoning based on the frustration-aggression hypothesis would lead one to expect a positive relationship between social anxiety scores and aggression index scores" (64)Palmer, Stuart - Aggression in fifty-eight non-literate societies: an exploratory analysis, 1970 - 2 Variables

    Building on previous research concerning murder and suicide, this study investigates 18 forms of aggression and explores how they might be engendered by certain child-training practices. Results show a weak connection between most forms of aggression and child-training practices, but non-literate societies do show a positive correlation between murder and suicide. The author develops a theory positing that experience of social blockage will be related to outwardly-directed aggression, whereas social loss will be related to inwardly-directed aggression.

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  6. "Exogamous matrilineal or patrilineal lineages, sibs, phratries, and/or moieties tend to be associated with kinship terminology of the bifurcate merging type" (164)Murdock, George Peter - Social structure, 1949 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  7. "When secondary or tertiary relatives of any kin-type are called by a kinship term used to denote a primary relative, the daughters of such secondary or tertiary relatives tend to be called by the same kinship term as the daughter of the primary relative" (139)Murdock, George Peter - Social structure, 1949 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  8. As women's access to economic resources increases, women's sexual unrestrictedness increases as well.Pirlott, Angela G. - Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Role of Parenting Costs Limiting Women’s Sex..., 2023 - 2 Variables

    Humans, just like other mammals, tend to allow greater sexual freedom for men rather than women. Furthermore, females are burdened with the majority of parenting. Do parenting costs limit sexual unrestrictedness to a different degree for males and females? The authors find that across 48 cultures, as women’s parenting costs decreased through improved physiological and economic conditions, women’s sexual unrestrictedness increased.

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  9. "This social classification and differentiation [of moieties] . . . should tend to produce a corresponding effect on kinship terminology, and thus result in the phenomenon of bifurcate merging" (57)Murdock, George Peter - Bifurcate merging: a test of five theories, 1947 - 2 Variables

    This study examines previous hypotheses concerning kinship terminologies, particularly the development of bifurcate merging. The roles of moieties, exogamy, unilinear kin groupings, unilinear descent, and preferential mating are considered.

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  10. "Where ghost fear is present, remarriage rates are great and the levirate and sororate are more likely to be present" (79)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspective, 1976 - 3 Variables

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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