Found 4370 Hypotheses across 437 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "Both rape and homosexuality show significant relationships with the custom of male genital mutilations during initiation ceremonies" (309)Minturn, Leigh - Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behavior, 1969 - 3 Variables

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  2. "The relative frequency of masculine and feminine nouns in languages with sex gender may be partially determined by . . . the degree of 'sex bias' present in the social structure" (206)Munroe, Robert L. - A cross cultural study of sex gender and social structure, 1969 - 4 Variables

    Authors hypothesize that grammatical sex gender may be related to social structural variables. Results support this hypothesis and suggest that the degree of sex bias in the social structure is associated with the relative frequency of masculine and feminine nouns in languages with sex gender.

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  3. "Societies having male genital mutilations as part of the initiation ceremonies condone or encourage homosexuality. . . . They also have more frequent homosexuality . . . and severely punish rape" (309)Minturn, Leigh - Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behavior, 1969 - 4 Variables

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  4. "Our cross-cultural data support Minturn and Lambert's conclusion, in that a moderately strong tendency exists in polygynous societies for co-wives who live in the same house to reject their children more often that co-wives who live with their children in separate dwellings . . ."Rohner, Ronald P. - They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental..., 1975 - 2 Variables

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  5. ". . . mothers who contribute to the family income, and who therefore have extensive duties other than child care, are less permissive about insubordination from their children than are mothers who are less burdened with chores that are unrelated to their children" (172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  6. Emotion semantics vary widely and significantly across language families (1519).Jackson, Joshua Conrad - Emotion semantics show both cultural variation and universal structure, 2019 - 2 Variables

    Researchers looked at the meaning of various emotion concepts, 'emotion semantics' in an attempt to determine the patterns and processes behind meaning cross-culturally. They used maps of colexification patterns (where semantically related concepts are named with the same word), adjusted Rand indices (ARIs) which indicated the similarities of two community's network structures, and various psychophysiological dimensions to test relationships and patterns of variability /structure in emotion semantics. These methods shed light on the underlying mechanisms behind emotions, both their words and their meanings in languages across the world. Their findings show substantial difference in language families and relationships between geographic proximity of language families and subsequent variation in emotion colexification tied to an evolutionary relationship, while also finding cultural universals in emotion colexification networks with languages primarily differentiating emotions on the basis of valence and activation.

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  7. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be correlated with the societal importance of women's work in the subsistence economy (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  8. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be related to the presence of absence of food taboos and similarly for food cravings (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  9. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of vegetable consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  10. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of fat consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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