Found 4542 Hypotheses across 455 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. 23) Reincarnation beliefs are positively associated with flexed burial posture.Matlock, James Graham - A cross-cultural study of reincarnation ideologies and their social correlates, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This dissertation discusses the divided theoretical approach to how reincarnation, animism, spirits, and general religious beliefs occur within societies cross-culturally. Matlock offers evidence to support Tyler, contradicting the generally accepted Durkheimian approach, arguing that the belief about souls and spirits may originate in dreams and other empirical experiences, in turn informing and shaping social organization. Durkheim argued the opposite, claiming that religious beliefs reflect social organization such as the clan and kinship. The author states 33 quantitative hypotheses to be tested using 30 of the first 60 sample societies available in the HRAF Probability Sample.

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  2. Expenditures in burials will be positively associated with mores allowing or encouraging competition.Kamp, Kathryn A. - Social hierarchy and burial treatments: a comparative assessment, 1998 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between existence of status hierarchies and the level of expense on burials. The aim is to assess the archaeological assumption that more expenditure on burials reflects elite statuses in society. Author concludes that competition is a more direct predictor of burial type than status hierarchy. Implications for archaeology are discussed.

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  3. 19) Reincarnation is positively associated with house and yard burial practices.Matlock, James Graham - A cross-cultural study of reincarnation ideologies and their social correlates, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This dissertation discusses the divided theoretical approach to how reincarnation, animism, spirits, and general religious beliefs occur within societies cross-culturally. Matlock offers evidence to support Tyler, contradicting the generally accepted Durkheimian approach, arguing that the belief about souls and spirits may originate in dreams and other empirical experiences, in turn informing and shaping social organization. Durkheim argued the opposite, claiming that religious beliefs reflect social organization such as the clan and kinship. The author states 33 quantitative hypotheses to be tested using 30 of the first 60 sample societies available in the HRAF Probability Sample.

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  4. Taboos on using the name of the deceased will be positively associated with name uniqueness, and negatively associated with belief in reincarnation, ancestor worship, societal size, and societal complexity (114).Alford, Richard - Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practices, 1987 - 23 Variables

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

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  5. 20) Reincarnation beliefs are positively associated with lineage and clan cemeteries.Matlock, James Graham - A cross-cultural study of reincarnation ideologies and their social correlates, 1993 - 2 Variables

    This dissertation discusses the divided theoretical approach to how reincarnation, animism, spirits, and general religious beliefs occur within societies cross-culturally. Matlock offers evidence to support Tyler, contradicting the generally accepted Durkheimian approach, arguing that the belief about souls and spirits may originate in dreams and other empirical experiences, in turn informing and shaping social organization. Durkheim argued the opposite, claiming that religious beliefs reflect social organization such as the clan and kinship. The author states 33 quantitative hypotheses to be tested using 30 of the first 60 sample societies available in the HRAF Probability Sample.

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  6. Protective-derogatory naming will be positively associated with societal size, complexity, and stratification (64).Alford, Richard - Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practices, 1987 - 16 Variables

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

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  7. Naming institutions which confer parenthood will be positively associated with societal size, complexity, and use of unilineal descent (32).Alford, Richard - Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practices, 1987 - 16 Variables

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

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  8. Political centralization among pre-colonial African ethnic institutions is positively associated with contemporary regional development (114).Michalopoulos, Stelios - Pre‐colonial ethnic institutions and contemporary African development, 2013 - 5 Variables

    The researchers test the relationship between political complexity among African pre-colonial ethnic institutions and contemporary economic performance (using light-density data as a proxy). Their tests yield a robust positive association even after controlling for multiple alternative geographic, cultural, and economic variables, which they interpret as underscoring the ongoing importance of ethnic-specific institutions in shaping economic activity in contemporary Africa.

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  9. 'Given name' as the only component of the complete, personal name will be negatively associated with societal size and complexity (52).Alford, Richard - Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practices, 1987 - 12 Variables

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

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  10. Centralized states are more likely to have political leaders decide sentencing for capital crimes (p.104-105).Otterbein, Keith F. - The ultimate coercive sanction, 1986 - 2 Variables

    The author presents a comprehensive study on the prevalence, presentation, and motivation of the "ultimate coercive sanction": capital punishment, or the "death penalty". He begins by examining capital punishment across all 53 cultures for which data was present in the Probability Sample Files, and finds that capital punishment is overwhelmingly present. After discerning some general trends, the author examines how capital punishment presents itself across different kinds of political systems, and uses the results to voice support for various theories on why the capital punishment is practiced. The study concludes by stating that the capital punishment may be something that human society may never be truly rid of, but greater societal stability may be able to reduce its prevalence.

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