Found 4372 Hypotheses across 438 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Marrying enemies is positively associated with men's fear of women and heterosexual sex (658).Ember, Carol R. - Men's fear of sex with women, 1978 - 2 Variables

    This study examines ecological, social, and psychological theories for men's fear of heterosexual sex in a cross-cultural sample. Findings support the hypotheses and a causal model is presented.

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  2. Greater contact between mother and child is positively associated with men's fear of sex with women (660).Ember, Carol R. - Men's fear of sex with women, 1978 - 2 Variables

    This study examines ecological, social, and psychological theories for men's fear of heterosexual sex in a cross-cultural sample. Findings support the hypotheses and a causal model is presented.

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  3. Mother sleeps closer to baby then to father and residence is patrilocal is positively associated with men's fear of sex with women (671).Ember, Carol R. - Men's fear of sex with women, 1978 - 3 Variables

    This study examines ecological, social, and psychological theories for men's fear of heterosexual sex in a cross-cultural sample. Findings support the hypotheses and a causal model is presented.

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  4. Food shortage and mother-child sleeping arrangements are directly related to men's heterosexual fear (42).Kitahara, Michio - Men's hetersexual fear due to reciprocal inhibition, 1981 - 3 Variables

    This article presents a reanalysis of a study by Ember (1978) examining the predictors of men's heterosexual fear. The author finds that Ember's model is not upheld and presents a new model of men's heterosexual fear using path analysis. Results suggest that mother-child sleeping arrangements and food shortage are directly related to men's heterosexual fear.

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  5. As women's access to economic resources increases, women's sexual unrestrictedness increases as well.Pirlott, Angela G. - Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Role of Parenting Costs Limiting Women’s Sex..., 2023 - 2 Variables

    Humans, just like other mammals, tend to allow greater sexual freedom for men rather than women. Furthermore, females are burdened with the majority of parenting. Do parenting costs limit sexual unrestrictedness to a different degree for males and females? The authors find that across 48 cultures, as women’s parenting costs decreased through improved physiological and economic conditions, women’s sexual unrestrictedness increased.

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  6. Chronic scarcity will be positively associated with subsistence diversity.Ember, Carol R. - Resource stress and subsistence diversification across societies, 2020 - 3 Variables

    Using a cross-cultural sample of 91 societies, this paper draws on ecological theory to test if unpredictable environments will favor subsistence diversification. The general hypothesis is that societies with high climate unpredictability and resource stress would exhibit more subsistence diversity than societies in more stable climates. The authors examined four environmental and resource stress variables while controlling for temperature variance, subsistence activity, and phylogeny. Support was found for 2 of the 4 variables--chronic scarcity and environmental instability. In the discussion they suggest that more commonly observed events (e.g. annual hunger and climate unpredictability) may give people more motivation to change subsistence than rarer events (e.g. natural hazards and famine).

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  7. As women's physiological parenting costs decrease, women's sexual unrestrictedness increases.Pirlott, Angela G. - Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Role of Parenting Costs Limiting Women’s Sex..., 2023 - 2 Variables

    Humans, just like other mammals, tend to allow greater sexual freedom for men rather than women. Furthermore, females are burdened with the majority of parenting. Do parenting costs limit sexual unrestrictedness to a different degree for males and females? The authors find that across 48 cultures, as women’s parenting costs decreased through improved physiological and economic conditions, women’s sexual unrestrictedness increased.

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  8. In societies where there is little or no food storage, a high threat of disasters will be associated with low valuation of fatness in women (261).Ember, Carol R. - Valuing thinness or fatness in women: reevaluating the effect of resource sc..., 2005 - 3 Variables

    This study focuses on preferences for thinness or fatness in women cross-culturally. Results contradict previous studies and the hypothesis that preference for fatness in women is predicted by resource scarcity. Alternative explanations for valuation of fatness are explored, including climate and male dominance.

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  9. "Societies with purely external warfare . . . have smaller total populations than societies with internal warfare" (141)Ember, Carol R. - An evaluation of alternative theories of matrilocal versus patrilocal residence, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This paper investigates the relationship between marital residence and warfare. The author evaluates two theories proposing opposite causalities: one, that internal warfarecauses patrilocality; the other, that residence comes first and influences type of warfare. The author presents a new model emphasizing the role of population size in determining type of warfare, which in turn affects marital residence. However, the role of migration in determining marital residence is also considered.

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  10. Increased frequency of natural hazards will be associated with increased subsistence diversity.Ember, Carol R. - Resource stress and subsistence diversification across societies, 2020 - 3 Variables

    Using a cross-cultural sample of 91 societies, this paper draws on ecological theory to test if unpredictable environments will favor subsistence diversification. The general hypothesis is that societies with high climate unpredictability and resource stress would exhibit more subsistence diversity than societies in more stable climates. The authors examined four environmental and resource stress variables while controlling for temperature variance, subsistence activity, and phylogeny. Support was found for 2 of the 4 variables--chronic scarcity and environmental instability. In the discussion they suggest that more commonly observed events (e.g. annual hunger and climate unpredictability) may give people more motivation to change subsistence than rarer events (e.g. natural hazards and famine).

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