Found 2542 Hypotheses across 255 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Infanticide occurs before the birth ceremony is performed (p. 72).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  2. The reasons for infanticide are similar to the reasons for abortion (p. 73).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  3. ". . . we hypothesized that mothers are more unstable [in mood] when they must spend large amounts of time caring for children" (171-172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  4. "Firstborns receive more elaborate ceremonies at birth . . . are given more duties to perform, have authority over siblings, and receive more respect from siblings" (51)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Birth order in cross-cultural perspective, 1974 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the consequences of birth order; results suggest that the firstborn child is more likely to have social authority as they grow older (they have siblings’ respect, they control property or head kin groups, etc.). The authors suggest that this authority may be legitimated by extra attention firstborns receive though elaborate birth ceremonies and teknonymy.

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  5. ". . . mothers who contribute to the family income, and who therefore have extensive duties other than child care, are less permissive about insubordination from their children than are mothers who are less burdened with chores that are unrelated to their children" (172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  6. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be related to the presence of absence of food taboos and similarly for food cravings (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  7. "In general, our hypothesis that mothers spend less time caring for their offspring when they have other people to help is confirmed . . ." (171)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  8. "Homosexuality is more frequent and more accepted in societies with a low initial indulgence of sex in children and a high severity of sex training" (309)Minturn, Leigh - Cultural patterning of sexual beliefs and behavior, 1969 - 3 Variables

    This paper is concerned with the variation in sexual behavior in humans. Authors test hypotheses regarding the relationships between sexual behaviors and beliefs concerning sex.

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  9. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be correlated with the societal importance of women's work in the subsistence economy (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  10. The presence or absence of morning sickness will be associated with various societal variables, including type and intensity of agriculture, settlement pattern, and community size (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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