Found 4333 Hypotheses across 434 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Patrilocality will be positively associated with men's training for obedience (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  2. Greater control of resources by women will be negatvely associated with obedience training for females (p. 313).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  3. More polygyny will be associated with training boys to strive more (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  4. More stratification will be positively associated with males' training to be industrious, and obedient and females' training to be sexually restrained and obedient. Stratification will be negatively associated with males and females' training to be self-reliant (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  5. Males will be trained to demonstrate more competitive behaviors useful for resource acquisition and control (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  6. Adult sex ratio is associated with women's participation in non-religious, community-wide meetings (7)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  7. Patterns of food storage and trade will be related to rainfall predictability (238).Low, Bobbi S. - Human responses to environmental extremeness and uncertainty: a cross-cultur..., 1988 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on the effect of environmental extremes and unpredictability on human behavior and reproductive strategies. Significant correlations were found between environmental extremes and unpredictability and several variables, including mobility, subsistence mode, and degree of polygyny.

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  8. Low rainfall seasonality is associated with greater female inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  9. Levels of pressure or anxiety/conflict children experience in regard to their performance of both individualistic and group-oriented behaviors tend to be positively correlated (p. 684).Zern, David - Relationships among selected child-rearing variables in a cross-cultural sam..., 1984 - 1 Variables

    This article examines child-training through children's display of individualistic orientations (self-reliance, achievement, and general independence) and/or group orientations (responsibility, nurturance, and obedience). Five sub-categories measure whether each orientation is linked to a child's experience of general pressure or performance anxiety/conflict. Together, these orientations their sub-categories total 30 variables that were correlated; differences in gender were also examined. Results indicate that child-rearing pressure to act one way predicts pressure to act in other ways, and this pattern of interaction between variables did not vary by gender.

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  10. Pathogen load is negatively associated with female inheritance of property (6)Low, Bobbi S. - Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differences, 1990 - 2 Variables

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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