Found 4135 Hypotheses across 414 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Intensity of agriculture will be negatively associated with marital structure (p. 706).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  2. Presence of plow animals will be negatively associated with polygyny (p. 705).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  3. Wives’ power will be positively associated with wives’ proportionate contribution to subsistence (28, 31-2).Lee, Gary R. - Conjugal power and spousal resources in patriarchal cultures, 1983 - 2 Variables

    This article reviews theories of marital power and tests for a relationship between wives’ contribution to subsistence and their conjugal power in patriarchal cultures. Results indicate a positive association. The role of cultural complexity is also considered; its relationship with wives’ power is negative and linear while its relationship with wives’ contribution to subsistence is negative and non-linear.

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  4. Autonomy in mate selection will be negatively associated with non-neolocal postmarital residence customs (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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  5. Romantic love as a criterion in mate selection will be negatively associated with non-neolocal postmarital residence customs (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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  6. In agricultural societies, female localization will be associated with female contribution to subsistence (16).Witkowski, Stanley - Environmental familiarity and models of band organization, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This manuscript examines the relationship between contribution to subsistence and residence localization. This relationship is explored separately for both genders in both agricultural and non-agricultural societies. Results indicate that the relationship is positive for males in non-agricultural societies and negative for females in agricultural societies. Tests on community size, marginality, and endogamy are also conducted.

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  7. "[There is an] absence of association between family type and modes of marriage . . . and between women's contribution to subsistence and modes of marriage" (157)Evascu, Thomas L. - A holocultural study of societal organization and modes of marriage: a gene..., 1975 - 3 Variables

    The author examines modes of marriage and societal organization from a functionalist (general evolutionary) perspective. He focuses on the relationships of subsistence (economic) patterns, settlement patterns, and social complexity to predicting modes of marriage, with particular emphasis on the importance of subsistence as an underlying structural influence upon social patterns.

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  8. In societies with greater female contribution to subsistence, polygyny will be prevalent. (243, 127).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  9. Autonomy in mate selection will be negatively associated with the prevalence of extended families (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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  10. Romantic love as a criterion in mate selection will be negatively associated with the prevalence of extended families (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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