Found 4430 Hypotheses across 443 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Among hunter-gatherers, women contribute more to subsistence than men (441).Ember, Carol R. - Myths about hunter-gatherers, 1978 - 1 Variables

    This article challenges common assumptions about hunter-gatherers and demonstrates that previous ideas about residence, division of labor and warfare are not supported by the cross-cultural data.

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  2. Hunter-gatherers are typically bilocal (440).Ember, Carol R. - Myths about hunter-gatherers, 1978 - 1 Variables

    This article challenges common assumptions about hunter-gatherers and demonstrates that previous ideas about residence, division of labor and warfare are not supported by the cross-cultural data.

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  3. Most hunter-gatherers are peaceful (443).Ember, Carol R. - Myths about hunter-gatherers, 1978 - 1 Variables

    This article challenges common assumptions about hunter-gatherers and demonstrates that previous ideas about residence, division of labor and warfare are not supported by the cross-cultural data.

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  4. Foragers will have less warfare than societies with other subsistence strategies (6).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  5. Frequency of homicide and assault will be related to subsistence type (14).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  6. Non-pacified foragers will be less likely to have unpredictable natural disasters than non-pacified food-producers (10).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  7. Non-pacified foragers are less likely to socialize for mistrust than non-pacified food-producers (11).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  8. Hunter-gatherers will experience more famine than those with other modes of subsistence (1).Berbesque, J. Colette - Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists, 2014 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

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  9. The more a society depends upon fishing, the more it should tend toward patrilocality. And the more a society depends upon gathering, the more it should tend toward matrilocality (202)Ember, Carol R. - Residential variation among hunter-gatherers, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study explores predictors of variation in two dimensions of marital residence patterns among hunter-gatherers: 1) the tendency toward patrilocality versus matrilocality and 2) the tendency toward unilocality versus bilocality.

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  10. "In the present hunter gatherer sample . . . when men's [subsistence] contribution is high . . . residence tends toward patrilocality; and when men's contribution is relatively low, residence tends toward matrilocality" (202)Ember, Carol R. - Residential variation among hunter-gatherers, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study explores predictors of variation in two dimensions of marital residence patterns among hunter-gatherers: 1) the tendency toward patrilocality versus matrilocality and 2) the tendency toward unilocality versus bilocality.

    Related HypothesesCite