Found 4179 Hypotheses across 418 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Matrilineal societies will be more likely to believe in reincarnation (156).Somersan, Semra - Death symbolism in matrilineal societies, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on death symbolism in relation to matrilineal descent. Findings suggest that matrilineal societies are more likely than patrilineal or bilateral societies to believe in ancestral spirits, reincarnation, and a quality of afterlife unconditioned on individual’s behavior.

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  2. Matrilineal societies will be more likely to believe in ancestral spirits (156).Somersan, Semra - Death symbolism in matrilineal societies, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on death symbolism in relation to matrilineal descent. Findings suggest that matrilineal societies are more likely than patrilineal or bilateral societies to believe in ancestral spirits, reincarnation, and a quality of afterlife unconditioned on individual’s behavior.

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  3. Retested Somersan's hypothesis that matrilineal societies would be characterized by death symbolism (ancestral spirit and reincarnation beliefs).Matlock, James G. - Death symbolism in matrilineal societies: a replication study, 1995 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a replication of Somersan's (1984) study of the relationship between death symbolism and descent group. The unsuccessful replication is attributed to sampling error. Codes are included.

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  4. Unilineal societies will be positively associated with prominent beliefs in ancestral spirits and reincarnation (170)Matlock, James G. - Death symbolism in matrilineal societies: a replication study, 1995 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a replication of Somersan's (1984) study of the relationship between death symbolism and descent group. The unsuccessful replication is attributed to sampling error. Codes are included.

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  5. Men and women of matrilineal descent will be more likely to choose to compete than those from patrilineal descent.Lowes, Sara - Kinship structure, stress, and the gender gap in competition, 2021 - 2 Variables

    The study builds on a previous study with the Maasai suggesting that matrilineal descent will close that gap of competitive behavior between men and women. The author conducted a lab experiment consisting of 614 individuals representative of 27 ethnic groups in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the experiment, the participants completed a timed matching game. First, they played alone with the goal to complete 5 games within 5 minutes to win money. Next, they competed against an undisclosed opponent to complete the most games and to keep all of the winnings. Finally, the participants were able to choose which pay they preferred based solely on the results from the first round. This was designed to reflect competition preference and results indicated that women were less likely to engage in competition regardless of kinship system.

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  6. "As far as the mother-in-law is concerned, matrilineal societies are most formal and bilateral least" (193)Goody, Jack - Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a comment, 1974 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  7. Evolution of belief in an afterlife will be positively associated with evolution of ancestor worship (273).Peoples, Hervey C. - Hunter-gatherers and the origins of religion, 2016 - 2 Variables

    What is the evolutionary sequence of beliefs in hunter-gatherers? The authors attempt to answer this question by reconstructing the development of various traits in traditional societies using phylogenetic and linguistic source trees. Testing for correlated evolution between this reconstruction and population history as proxied by linguistic classification suggests the presence of animism at profound time depth, aligning with classical anthropological religious theory put forth by E.B. Tylor. Coevolutions between other religious concepts including shamanism, ancestor worship, active ancestor worship, high gods, active high gods, and belief in an afterlife are also examined.

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  8. Evolution of belief in an afterlife will be positively asociated with evolution of shaminism (272).Peoples, Hervey C. - Hunter-gatherers and the origins of religion, 2016 - 2 Variables

    What is the evolutionary sequence of beliefs in hunter-gatherers? The authors attempt to answer this question by reconstructing the development of various traits in traditional societies using phylogenetic and linguistic source trees. Testing for correlated evolution between this reconstruction and population history as proxied by linguistic classification suggests the presence of animism at profound time depth, aligning with classical anthropological religious theory put forth by E.B. Tylor. Coevolutions between other religious concepts including shamanism, ancestor worship, active ancestor worship, high gods, active high gods, and belief in an afterlife are also examined.

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  9. Bilateral or ambilineal descent systems are likely to have less complex kinship systems than patrilineal or matrilineal ones (11).Rácz, Péter - Social Practice and Shared History, Not Social Scale, Structure Cross-Cultur..., 2019 - 5 Variables

    Researchers examined kinships terminology systems for explanations regarding specifically observed typology of kin terms for cousins cross-culturally. They explore two theories, the first relating to population size via bottleneck evolution, and the second relating to social practices that shape kinship systems. Using the Ethnographic Atlas within D-PLACE, 936 societies with kinship system information were studied. The findings did not suggest a relationship between increased community size and a decrease in kinship complexity, however the research does suggest a relationship between practices of marriage and descent and kinship complexity.

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  10. Small-scale societies will believe that ancestral spirits are capable of harming the living.White, Claire - The dead may kill you: Do ancestor spirit beliefs promote cooperation in tra..., 1 - 1 Variables

    Using 57 cultures from the Human Relations Area Files database, this paper examines the function and effectiveness of the belief of punitive ancestors in small-scale societies. The authors found that belief in dangerous ancestral entities is widespread and common and that harm is preventable through ritualized mortuary practices. The authors concluded that the fear of ancestral spirits did not promote social cooperation or inhibit self-interest behavior, contrary to the supernatural punishment hypothesis.

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