Found 2771 Hypotheses across 278 Pages (0.054 seconds)
  1. Seasonal time pressure--as indicated by number of dry months--will be associated with decreased female participation in agriculture (574).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  2. Population pressure (measured by population density) will be associated with increased male agricultural participation and decreased female agricultural participation (574).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  3. A high degree of dependence on domesticated animals will decrease female agricultural contributions.Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  4. Dependence on tree crops will be associated with decreased female participation in agriculture (577).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  5. Dependence on root crops will be associated with increased female contribution to agriculture.Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  6. Production of cereal crops will be associated with decreased female contribution to agriculture (574).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  7. Division of labor is examined as relating to economy of effort and nursing constraints.Burton, Michael L. - A model of the sexual division of labor, 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study presents a model of sexual division of labor using entailment analysis that accounts for distance of the task away from home and danger of the task. Results support the notion that childbirth and nursing are the main constraints on the sexual division of labor and that men tend to be allocated tasks that are more distant and dangerous.

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  8. Constraints on expansion into new lands will be negatively associated with polygyny (p. 875-6).White, Douglas R. - Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfare, 1988 - 3 Variables

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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  9. Internal warfare will decrease with increasing external warfare, intercommunity trade, and patrilocal residence (6).Grueter, Cyril C. - On the emergence of large-scale human social integration and its antecedents..., 2014 - 4 Variables

    This article investigates whether external warfare, intercommunity trade, and female exogamy lead to more amicable intercommunity relationships. Intercommunity amicability is considered a historical facilitator of the large-scale integration of human groups. The absence of internal warfare is used as a measure for intercommunity amicability.

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  10. Marriage of female war captives (x small population) will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 875).White, Douglas R. - Causes of polygyny: ecology, economy, kinship, and warfare, 1988 - 2 Variables

    This article uses two dependent variables: acceptance of polygyny (the rules) and and the percentage of women in polygynous marriages (the behavior). The rules of marriage are best predicted by social structural variables (e.g. warfare, fraternal interest groups) whereas actual marriage behaviors are best predicted by economic and ecological variables (e.g. climate zone). Deemphasizing exclusively reproductive or economic explanations for polygyny, the authors find polygyny is related to male-oriented kin groups, territorial expansion and migration, and marrying war captives. Polygyny is thus thought to have a stratifying effect on women and is ultimately a detriment to female status.

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