Found 3709 Hypotheses across 371 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Male childhood companions will be negatively associated with the frequency of male homosexuality (352).Werner, Dennis - A cross-cultural perspective on theory and research on male homosexuality, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article reviews psychological, sociobiological, and cultural materialist theories on male homosexuality. The author tests hypotheses focusing on parent-child relations, the gender of childhood companions, and residence patterns. Only the gender of childhood companions was significantly associated with homosexuality.

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  2. Extremely high male contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with patrilocality (335, 360).Korotayev, Andrey V. - Division of labor by gender and postmarital residence in cross-cultural pers..., 2003 - 2 Variables

    This article presents a review of theories relating postmarital residence with the gender division of labor. The author suggests that there will be an association between these two variables if societies with an extremely low female contribution to subsistence are contrasted with the rest of the world cultures. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  3. Marriage payments, patrilineal descent, patrilocal residence, extended family forms and importance of inheritance rules will be positively associated with sexual dominance (679)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

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  4. Parent-child sleeping arrangements, parent-child sleeping distances, and parental residence will be associated with frequency of male homosexuality (348).Werner, Dennis - A cross-cultural perspective on theory and research on male homosexuality, 1979 - 4 Variables

    This article reviews psychological, sociobiological, and cultural materialist theories on male homosexuality. The author tests hypotheses focusing on parent-child relations, the gender of childhood companions, and residence patterns. Only the gender of childhood companions was significantly associated with homosexuality.

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  5. "Societies with uxorilocal/matrilocal residence are more likely to have a high frequency of external warfare than societies with virilocal/patrilocal residence" (275).Carter, Jr., Harold - Military organization as a response to residence and size of population: a c..., 1977 - 2 Variables

    This study tests an adaptational theory of military organization. Test of the relationship between population, residence type and military organization are presented; findings support the hypotheses.

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  6. Matriliny/matrilocality is associated with the absence of nuclear families.Surowiec, Alexandra - A worldwide view of matriliny: using cross-cultural analyses to shed light o..., 2019 - 3 Variables

    The study is about matrilineal systems, where descent is traced along female lines. Matrilineal systems are relatively rare in human populations, and previous research has discussed the rarity and apparent instability of matriliny. The study aims to study the evolution of descent systems on a worldwide scale. The study tests for significant associations between matriliny and numerous cultural traits that have been theoretically associated with its stability or loss, such as subsistence strategy, animal domestication, mating system, residence pattern, wealth transfer, and property succession. Additionally, by combining genetic and linguistic information to build a global supertree that includes 16 matrilineal populations, the study also performs phylogenetically controlled analyses to assess the patterns of correlated evolution between descent and other traits.

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  7. Matrilocal/ambilocal residence will be positively associated with higher female status (162).Broude, Gwen J. - Revisiting status-envy: does the theory hold up?, 1989 - 2 Variables

    Author first tests the validity of the variables traditionallyused in tests of status envy theory. Then the author tests some of the implications of the theory and proposes somewhat different mechanisms.

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  8. Higher status of the elderly will be associated with agricultural rather than exploitative economies, extended rather than nuclear family organization, inheritance of real property, and patrilocal rather than other residence patterns (270).Lee, Gary R. - Status of the elderly: economic and familial antecedents, 1984 - 5 Variables

    This article investigates how status of the elderly is affected by economic type, family organization, inheritance of real property, and unilocal residence patterns. Multivariate analysis ultimately suggests that agricultural economy, patrilocal residence, and fully extended family systems are significant predictors of higher status of the elderly. No major gender differences were discovered.

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  9. Women’s power in marriage will be associated with nuclear rather than extended family organization (124).Warner, Rebecca L. - Social organization, spousal resources, and marital power: a cross-cultural ..., 1986 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the effect of family structural complexity, residence and descent system, and female contribution to subsistence on women's power in marriage. Results suggest that wives have more power in marriage where there is nuclear family organization and matrilocality. The authors suggest that resource theory should broaden its conception of valued resources to include dimensions such as family organization patterns.

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  10. Patrilocality will be positively associated with men's training for obedience (p. 312).Low, Bobbi S. - Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspective, 1989 - 3 Variables

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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