Found 2748 Hypotheses across 275 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. "Societies in which mothers are highly salient to their infants as a consequence of being carried in close contact should also perform male circumcision rites or practice the couvade or both as a method of resolving or expressing sex-identity conflict" (626).Munroe, Robert L. - Male sex role resolutions, 1981 - 3 Variables

    This chapter discusses the predictors of the couvade and male circumcision ceremonies cross-culturally. New findings suggest relationships between these two variables and infant carrying practices, marital residence, and descent.

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  2. Patrilocal residence will predict circumcision ceremonies and matrilocal residence will predict the couvade (626).Munroe, Robert L. - Male sex role resolutions, 1981 - 3 Variables

    This chapter discusses the predictors of the couvade and male circumcision ceremonies cross-culturally. New findings suggest relationships between these two variables and infant carrying practices, marital residence, and descent.

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  3. Father-salience in infancy will be positively associated with the couvade (731).Munroe, Robert L. - A response to broude on the couvade, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates determinants of the couvade; the authors reexamine some of their earlier findings and also consider Broude’s (1988) response to their previous studies. Exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements, matrilocal residence, and “protest masculinity” (a concept suggested by Broude) were all found to be associated with the couvade. Father-salience in infancy, also suggested by Broude, was only marginally associated.

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  4. Exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements, matrilocal residence, and “protest masculinity” will be positively associated with the couvade (730-731).Munroe, Robert L. - A response to broude on the couvade, 1989 - 4 Variables

    This article investigates determinants of the couvade; the authors reexamine some of their earlier findings and also consider Broude’s (1988) response to their previous studies. Exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements, matrilocal residence, and “protest masculinity” (a concept suggested by Broude) were all found to be associated with the couvade. Father-salience in infancy, also suggested by Broude, was only marginally associated.

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  5. ". . . the effect of focus on mother's descent group does not reverse the allocation of roles in the nuclear family" (335)Zelditch, Morris - Role differentiation in the nuclear family: a comparative study, 1955 - 2 Variables

    In a volume devoted to the understanding of the American family, the author, using data from 56 societies, tests a couple of hypotheses about role differentiation in the nuclear family.

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  6. ". . . Malinowski's hypothesis . . . states that we expect all matrilineal cases to show both father and mother [have] expressive [roles]" (329)Zelditch, Morris - Role differentiation in the nuclear family: a comparative study, 1955 - 2 Variables

    In a volume devoted to the understanding of the American family, the author, using data from 56 societies, tests a couple of hypotheses about role differentiation in the nuclear family.

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  7. There will be a negative association between male transvestism and the couvade (52).Munroe, Robert L. - Male transvestism and the couvade: a psycho-cultural analysis, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines institutionalized male transvestism and the couvade, finding that they are mutually exclusive in a cross-cultural sample. Possible explanations for the negative association between male transvestism and the couvade (e.g. sex-identity differentiation and confusion) are discussed.

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  8. "This . . . custom [the couvade] . . . proves to be not merely incidentally an indicator of the tendency of society from maternal to paternal, but the very sign and record of that vast change" (10)Tylor, Edward B. - On a method of investigating the development of institutions: applied to la..., 1961 - 2 Variables

    This paper, the first cross-cultural study published in 1889 (reprinted here) asserts that tabulation and classification are important methodological tools to study anthropological subjects. The author investigates the development of institutions of marriage and descent, tabulating data on residence, descent, kinship terminology, wife capture, and exogamy.

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  9. "Where the female status is seen as privileged both in infancy and in childhood . . . a man would have a strong optative feminine identity and the society should provide him some means to act out symbolically at least, the female role" (113)Burton, Roger V. - The absent father and cross-sex identity, 1963 - 3 Variables

    This study advances the status envy hypothesis of sex identification to explain customs such as male initiation ceremonies and the couvade. Theory of sex identification is discussed; resource withholding, exclusive mother-child sleeping, patrilocality, father absence, female status, and initiation are all considered. Hypotheses are supported with empirical tests.

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  10. "The prediction . . . was that the couvade would be found in association with mother-infant sleeping arrangements, and/or matri-residence. . . . Relatively low male salience, as experienced by male children in societies characterized by a form of matri-residence [or] . . . in the presence of exclusive mother-infant sleeping arrangements . . . might lead to cross-sex identity and to a particular projective system outcome--the couvade" (40, 39)Munroe, Robert L. - The couvade: a psychological analysis, 1973 - 3 Variables

    This study examines possible correlates of the couvade. Results suggest that matri-residence, mother-infant sleeping arrangements, and low male salience all are associated with the couvade.

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