Found 3219 Hypotheses across 322 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Controlling for habitat quality, hunter-gatherers will experience more famine than agriculturalists (1).Berbesque, J. Colette - Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalists, 2014 - 3 Variables

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

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  2. Hunters and gatherers will experience less frequent and drastic famine than other subsistence types (38).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 3 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  3. Hunter gatherers have fewer religious coping mechanisms than intensive agriculturalists.Pierro, Rachele - Local knowledge and practice in disaster relief: A worldwide cross-cultural ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    The article discusses the importance of incorporating local knowledge and strategies into sustainable climate change adaptation. The authors examined 90 societies from the ethnographic record to document the coping mechanisms and contingency plans used by societies around the world in response to natural hazards. They classified coping mechanisms into four types: technological, subsistence, economic, and religious. The study finds that most societies employ multiple types of coping mechanisms and that technological coping mechanisms are most common in response to fast-onset hazards, while religious coping mechanisms are most common in response to slow-onset hazards. The study also finds that religious and nonreligious coping strategies are not mutually exclusive and are often used in conjunction with each other.

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  4. Hunter gatherers have fewer technological coping mechanisms than intensive agriculturalists.Pierro, Rachele - Local knowledge and practice in disaster relief: A worldwide cross-cultural ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    The article discusses the importance of incorporating local knowledge and strategies into sustainable climate change adaptation. The authors examined 90 societies from the ethnographic record to document the coping mechanisms and contingency plans used by societies around the world in response to natural hazards. They classified coping mechanisms into four types: technological, subsistence, economic, and religious. The study finds that most societies employ multiple types of coping mechanisms and that technological coping mechanisms are most common in response to fast-onset hazards, while religious coping mechanisms are most common in response to slow-onset hazards. The study also finds that religious and nonreligious coping strategies are not mutually exclusive and are often used in conjunction with each other.

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  5. Hunter gatherers have fewer economic coping mechanisms than intensive agriculturalists.Pierro, Rachele - Local knowledge and practice in disaster relief: A worldwide cross-cultural ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    The article discusses the importance of incorporating local knowledge and strategies into sustainable climate change adaptation. The authors examined 90 societies from the ethnographic record to document the coping mechanisms and contingency plans used by societies around the world in response to natural hazards. They classified coping mechanisms into four types: technological, subsistence, economic, and religious. The study finds that most societies employ multiple types of coping mechanisms and that technological coping mechanisms are most common in response to fast-onset hazards, while religious coping mechanisms are most common in response to slow-onset hazards. The study also finds that religious and nonreligious coping strategies are not mutually exclusive and are often used in conjunction with each other.

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  6. Intensive agriculturalists will have more coping mechanisms for dealing with natural hazards than hunter-gatherers.Pierro, Rachele - Local knowledge and practice in disaster relief: A worldwide cross-cultural ..., 2022 - 2 Variables

    The article discusses the importance of incorporating local knowledge and strategies into sustainable climate change adaptation. The authors examined 90 societies from the ethnographic record to document the coping mechanisms and contingency plans used by societies around the world in response to natural hazards. They classified coping mechanisms into four types: technological, subsistence, economic, and religious. The study finds that most societies employ multiple types of coping mechanisms and that technological coping mechanisms are most common in response to fast-onset hazards, while religious coping mechanisms are most common in response to slow-onset hazards. The study also finds that religious and nonreligious coping strategies are not mutually exclusive and are often used in conjunction with each other.

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  7. Non-pacified foragers will be less likely to have unpredictable natural disasters than non-pacified food-producers (10).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  8. Gathering is the most important subsistence activity among hunter-gatherers (440).Ember, Carol R. - Myths about hunter-gatherers, 1978 - 1 Variables

    This article challenges common assumptions about hunter-gatherers and demonstrates that previous ideas about residence, division of labor and warfare are not supported by the cross-cultural data.

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  9. Foreign intrusions will increase the fequency and severity of famine among indigenous peoples (40).Dirks, Robert - Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis tests, 1993 - 3 Variables

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

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  10. Foragers will have less warfare than societies with other subsistence strategies (6).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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