Found 2452 Hypotheses across 246 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Political complexity of the society in which a language is spoken will be positively associated with the geographic range of that language (7340).Currie, Thomas E. - Political complexity predicts the spread of ethnolinguistic groups, 2009 - 6 Variables

    The researchers utilize a GIS approach in order to examine the relationship between global linguistic distribution and various cultural and environmental factors. The resulting positive association between political complexity and both latitude and language range leads the researchers to propose that large, politically complex entities exert a homogenizing pressure on language. However, the causal link may also be in the other direction, with possession of common language facilitating the creation of more complex political institutions.

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  2. Geographic language area will be positively associated with net primary productivity among Australian and American foragers, but weakly or insignificantly associated with NPP among American agriculturalists (7).Currie, Thomas E. - The evolution of ethnolinguistic diversity, 2012 - 2 Variables

    The authors test the relationship between ethnolinguistic area and various environmental variables in a cross-cultural sample of hunter-gatherer, pastoral, and agricultural subsistence groups in order to evaluate various hypotheses surrounding the geographic and ecological origins of cultural diversity. They propose that societies which adopted agriculture at the beginning of the Holocene were less directly affected by climate which, combined with the effect of increasing political and cultural complexity, allowed coordination and homogenization of ethnolinguistic groups over a broader swathe of territory.

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  3. Association between geographic language area and various environmental variables will be stronger among pastoralists and foragers than among agriculturalists (7).Currie, Thomas E. - The evolution of ethnolinguistic diversity, 2012 - 6 Variables

    The authors test the relationship between ethnolinguistic area and various environmental variables in a cross-cultural sample of hunter-gatherer, pastoral, and agricultural subsistence groups in order to evaluate various hypotheses surrounding the geographic and ecological origins of cultural diversity. They propose that societies which adopted agriculture at the beginning of the Holocene were less directly affected by climate which, combined with the effect of increasing political and cultural complexity, allowed coordination and homogenization of ethnolinguistic groups over a broader swathe of territory.

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  4. Moralizing high gods are most likely to be found in ecologically inhospitable and unpredictable environments, in politically complex societies, in societies near (or linguistically related to) other societies with high gods, and in societies with animal husbandry and/or agriculture.Botero, Carlos A. - The ecology of religious beliefs, 2014 - 8 Variables

    Belief in moralizing high gods (MHGs) has been theorized as a response to unfavorable environments, as a way to normalize behavior. In this study, researchers test the theory by creating a model for predicting the distribution of MHGs. They run many alternative models, testing the effects of resource abundance, climate stability, and pertinent social factors on the occurrence of belief in MHGs. Based on the ten most supported models, they create an average model that predicts MHGs within cultures with “excellent” accuracy.

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  5. Length of conversational turn-taking transition will vary between cultures independent of other predictors (10588).Stivers, Tanya - Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation, 2009 - 2 Variables

    In order to investigate cross-cultural variation in systems of conversational turn-taking (who speaks and when), the researchers analyze the association of various contextual, verbal, and non-verbal factors with mean response time. Despite some variation in response time between languages, each of the explanatory variables is found to have significant impact on response time independent of language. A further test on subjective perception of ideal response time suggests that although similar factors act on response patterns cross-culturally (in support of a 'universal systems' theory), speakers are hypersensitive to even minor cultural variations in response time.

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  6. Political evolution followed a non-sequential "alternative trajectories" model of increasing complexity.Currie, Thomas E. - Rise and fall of political complexity in island South-East Asia and the Pacific, 2010 - 1 Variables

    Using phylogenetic modeling, the researchers test hypotheses for different sequences of political complexity among South-East Asian and Pacific Austronesian-speaking cultures. The research adds to an existing debate between sequential, incremental political evolution models and non-sequential models with larger increases in complexity. The results suggest support for a more sequential unilinear model.

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  7. Political evolution followed a non-sequential "reversible alternative trajectories" model of increasing complexity.Currie, Thomas E. - Rise and fall of political complexity in island South-East Asia and the Pacific, 2010 - 1 Variables

    Using phylogenetic modeling, the researchers test hypotheses for different sequences of political complexity among South-East Asian and Pacific Austronesian-speaking cultures. The research adds to an existing debate between sequential, incremental political evolution models and non-sequential models with larger increases in complexity. The results suggest support for a more sequential unilinear model.

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  8. Political evolution followed an entirely "full" non-sequential model of increasing complexity.Currie, Thomas E. - Rise and fall of political complexity in island South-East Asia and the Pacific, 2010 - 1 Variables

    Using phylogenetic modeling, the researchers test hypotheses for different sequences of political complexity among South-East Asian and Pacific Austronesian-speaking cultures. The research adds to an existing debate between sequential, incremental political evolution models and non-sequential models with larger increases in complexity. The results suggest support for a more sequential unilinear model.

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  9. Political evolution followed a rectilinear sequence of incremental steps in the direction of increasing complexity.Currie, Thomas E. - Rise and fall of political complexity in island South-East Asia and the Pacific, 2010 - 1 Variables

    Using phylogenetic modeling, the researchers test hypotheses for different sequences of political complexity among South-East Asian and Pacific Austronesian-speaking cultures. The research adds to an existing debate between sequential, incremental political evolution models and non-sequential models with larger increases in complexity. The results suggest support for a more sequential unilinear model.

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  10. Political evolution followed a unilinear sequence of incremental steps in the direction of increasing complexity.Currie, Thomas E. - Rise and fall of political complexity in island South-East Asia and the Pacific, 2010 - 1 Variables

    Using phylogenetic modeling, the researchers test hypotheses for different sequences of political complexity among South-East Asian and Pacific Austronesian-speaking cultures. The research adds to an existing debate between sequential, incremental political evolution models and non-sequential models with larger increases in complexity. The results suggest support for a more sequential unilinear model.

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